Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 30 Wednesday

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Deuteronomy 31:14-30

As the end of Moses' life approached, God ordained Joshua to be the leader of His people. He also told Moses what the future held for the nation of Israel.

Does God issue any commands in this passage?

  • (31:14) God told Moses to call Joshua and meet Him in the tabernacle so that God could commission Joshua for service.
  • (31:19-21) God told Moses to write a song to teach the Children of Israel the ways of the LORD so that when they went astray the song would be a witness against them.
  • (31:23) God commanded Joshua to be strong and courageous.
  • (31:26) The completed law was given to the Levites who were commanded to take it and place it inside the Ark of the Covenant.


Does God make any promises?

  • (31:23) God promised Joshua that He would be with him to bring the people across the Jordan River.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • Moses, their leader, was about to die after living among them for so long. He was a type of Jesus, the leader who left His followers in order to die.
  • Moses spoke of the evil that would happen to his people after his death and in the latter days. Jesus spoke of the evil that would befall His people (the disciples and all who believe) after His death and in the latter days.
  • Joshua was then to be the type of Jesus. As leader of the Children of Promise he portrayed Christ, the Holy Man of God who leads us into Promise.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Moses spoke of evil that will befall the Israelites in the latter days. Since we live in the latter days this prophecy might already be fulfilled or perhaps there is still part of it yet to happen.

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 30 Tuesday

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Deuteronomy 30:11-31:13


For this commandment which I command thee this day, it is not hidden from thee, neither is it far off. It is not in heaven, that thou shouldest say, Who shall go up for us to heaven, and bring it unto us, that we may hear it, and do it? But the word is very nigh unto thee, in thy mouth, and in thy heart, that thou mayest do it.  Deuteronomy 30:11-14

Does God issue any commands in this passage?


  • (30:16) Through Moses God commanded the people to love the LORD their God and walk in His ways.
  • (31:10-13) They were to observe a year of release every 7th year and they were to read the commandment aloud so that everyone who had heard it previously would be reminded of the conditions of the covenant and any children or foreigners might hear it for the first time and follow it.


Does God make any promises?

  • (30:16) If the people would love the LORD and walk in His ways they would experience life, parenthood, and other blessings.
  • (30:17-18) If the people would not love the LORD and walk in His ways they would perish and not prolong their days on the land. 
  • (31:3-8) In his charge to the people and to Joshua, Moses told them that God would go before them into battle to destroy the wicked nations so they had no reason to fear.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • No man could ascend into Heaven to obtain a copy of the covenant, but just as Moses ascended into Mount Sinai and received the commandments that make up the covenant and then descended the mount to give the covenant agreement to the people, so did Jesus come down to ratify the covenant with His blood. (See John 3:13 and Romans 10:4-10)
  • It is not God's will that any should perish so He sent His Son into the world so that whosoever believes in Him will not perish but will have everlasting life. (See John 3:15-17)
  • (31:3, 8) The one who was to go before them over the Jordan River was the Angel of the LORD (not specified by name in this passage but previously introduced to them). This was most likely a pre-incarnate Jesus who would resume command as Captain of the Host following the years of wilderness wanderings.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • The "big picture" of the future can be partly understood, but the day-by-day details are hidden from us. Just as Moses told Joshua and the people to walk without fear and by faith until they reached the destination promised to them, so must God's people today leave the details to God and walk without fear and by faith until they reach their destination. We have the same LORD God that they had because He is the same yesterday, today, and forever. He will get us safely to our future home.

Monday, July 29, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 30 Monday

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Deuteronomy 29:1-30:10

The LORD gave the people a covenant in Moab just like He did in Horeb. Those who were young when they left Egypt had witnessed both the first and the second ratification ceremonies. Their clothes and shoes had not grown old or ill-fitting in the 40 years of travel. They had not been required to provide their own food or drink along the way. They had already seen some of the land conquered and more blessings were promised. The covenant was theirs to accept!

Does God  issue any commands in this passage?

  • (29:1) God commanded Moses to tell this second generation all of the words of the covenant. (That is what we have been reading in this book!)
  • (29: 9) They were commanded to keep the words of the covenant.


Does God make any promises?

  • (29:13) God promised to take them as His people because He had sworn to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob that He would do so.
  • (29:20-21) The LORD would not spare those who wished to imitate the wicked inhabitants of Canaan. The land would turn from fertile grasslands into sulfurous desert.
  • (30:1-10) God promised that He would return them to the land from the places where they had been driven if they would repent and follow His statutes with all their hearts and souls.
  • (30:6) God promised to circumcise their hearts so that they would love Him. This was to follow the time of their captivity.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • Jesus is the mediator of the covenant. Man could not keep the covenant so God sent His Son to reconcile God and man.
  • Jesus is the one that circumcises the hearts of men. (See Colossians 2:8-14.)


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • (29:14-15) God made it clear that not everyone was present at that ceremony who would benefit from the covenant. Hebrews 8:7-13 tells us that the old covenant passed away but that God made a new covenant with them through their Redeemer and the covenant extends to all who believe. Someday the covenant will be completely fulfilled and God's people, Jews and Gentiles, will keep the covenant! (Peter preached about the new covenant in Acts chapter 2. See especially verse 39.)
  • (30:7) God promised to put all the curses upon the Jews' enemies. This has not happened yet in its entirety.

Journal Through the Bible: Week 29 Saturday

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Deuteronomy 28:15-68

This prophecy of Moses that was given to warn them of future woes if they did not follow the LORD, and Moses had made it clear that he already knew that they wouldn't, must have been as difficult for him to write as it is for us to read. Sadder still is the fact that we can look back into history and know that these curses came true. Verses 49-57 foretell the reprehensible things that happened in Israel and Judah during the Assyrian and Babylonian sieges.

Does God issue any commands in this passage?

  • They were to obey the LORD.


Does God make any promises in this passage?

  • If they did not obey God they would be cursed in the city, in the fields, in their storage and storehouses, in their pregnancies, in their produce and flocks, whenever or wherever they went, and in everything they did so that they would perish quickly from the land. They would be sick and die too young. There would be very little rain. They would be defeated by their enemies. They would be afflicted with the incurable diseases of Egypt. They would experience madness, blindness, and panic. They would be robbed and oppressed. They would leave young widows with houses that they themselves did not live in very long and crops that they did not get to eat. Their livestock would be stolen by enemies and their children would be taken into slavery by other nations. They would be removed into foreign lands where they would be required to worship false gods. And everyone who heard the tale would laugh at them. There would be sparse crops because of drought and insect infestation. They would be in debt to other nations. They would eventually be conquered by faraway nations and would eat their own children due to starvation. Fear would be with them constantly. Some of them would even be taken back into Egypt.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • Not that I found.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Not that I found.

Sunday, July 28, 2013

TAKE TIME: Reading Assignment for July 29-August 3

Introduction: We are coming to the end of the book of Deuteronomy. In the last few chapters we will read a review of the covenant between God and His people. Moses will prophecy of their future scattering and restoration. He will preach a final charge to his successor, Joshua, and he will teach a song to the people before ascending Mount Nebo. The last chapter is probably written by Joshua since the book concludes with the events immediately following the death of Moses.


Reading Assignment:
  • Monday - Deuteronomy 29:1-30:10
  • Tuesday - Deuteronomy 30:11-31:13
  • Wednesday - Deuteronomy 31:14-30
  • Thursday - Deuteronomy 32:1-47
  • Friday - Deuteronomy 32:48-33:29
  • Saturday - Deuteronomy chapter 34


Memory Verse

The secret things belong unto the LORD our God: but those things which are revealed belong unto us and to our children for ever, that we may do all the words of this law. Deuteronomy 29:29


Prayer Journal (ACTS)
  • Adoration - This week take time each day to praise God for being Truth.
  • Confession - Ask God to reveal hidden sin in your life and then confess it.
  • Thanksgiving - Thank God for His promises. He always keeps them.
  • Supplication - What are your prayer requests this week? List them for future reference so that you can see how God answers.


Search the Scriptures

Look for references for each of the following:
  • Promises that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?
  • References that either refer to or infer something about future events.
  • What does this passage teach about Jesus?
  • Commandments that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?


Putting the Word into Action

This week we will read of the passing of the leadership baton from Moses to Joshua. One of the reasons Joshua was ready to take control was because Moses had spent quite a bit of time training him for the job. Sometimes we need to teach others to do things we do ourselves. Find a willing student and a task to teach them. Or find someone to teach you something you've been wanting to learn. Being a student is just as important as being the teacher and passing on instruction from one person to another is valuable for many situations.

Journal Through the Bible: Week 29 Friday

(Thank you for your patience as I attempt to get the journal pages uploaded. It was a great week of church camp, but I got behind in my posts. It will take a few more days to get everything caught up.)

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Deuteronomy 27:1-28:14

Does God issue any commands in this passage?
  • (27:1-8) Through Moses God commanded the people to set up large stone pillars with the words of His commandments on them in Mt. Ebal after the people had crossed over Jordan. There was also to be an altar built there of whole, uncut stones where they were to offer peace offerings, eat, and rejoice!
  • (27:9-10) The people were admonished to listen and pay attention to the commands so that they would obey them.
  • (27:11-26) Half of the tribes were to stand on Mount Gerizim to bless the people, the other half were to stand on Mount Ebal to curse the people, and the Levites were to stand in the valley between them and pronounce curses upon those who made idols, dishonored their parents, removed their neighbor's boundary posts, led the blind astray, perverted justice to widows and orphans and strangers, had familiar relations with his stepmother or animals or sisters or mother-in-law, struck down his neighbor secretly, took a contract to kill an innocent person, refused to confirm the words of the laws by doing them. The people answered, "Amen."


Does God make any promises?

  • God promised to curse those who refused to confirm the words of the laws.
  • On the other hand, God promised that if they would affirm the laws they would be set above all other nations of the earth. The Levites stood in the valley and pronounced blessings in the city and the field, for abundant increase of children and produce and livestock, for abundance in storage, for blessings upon all their business affairs, all enemies would be smitten, daily routines would be blessed, and God would establish them as holy people for Himself as He had promised to do so that all people of the earth would see that the Hebrews were protected by God and would respect them. There would always be plenty. The LORD would open all His treasures to them including giving the rain in season so that crops would grow and all work would be prosperous. They would always be the lenders but never the borrowers. God would put them ahead of everyone else and never behind. These promises were all conditional: they must obey His commands.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?
  • Jesus is the peace offering in the Promised Land. Through Him we pass from death unto life!
  • Jesus was sinless. He never did anything to bring a curse upon Himself. He died for our sins, not His own. He took our curse for us.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?
  • Sometimes the picture of "crossing over Jordan" is used to illustrate the death of a believer (it also signifies entering into a relationship with God through Jesus Christ because the believer passes from death unto life). When a believer dies, he will enter the land that flows with milk and honey: a land where obeying the former commands will be automatic and without temptation to do otherwise. The peace offering has already been given on the believer's behalf by Jesus. The believer will be able to eat and he will definitely rejoice!
  • God promised a curse to those who refused to follow His way of righteousness. That still stands. Someday those who have not been made righteous through Jesus Christ will be eternally cursed.
  • God promised to bless all who accepted His way of righteousness and that still stands as well. Someday all who have been made righteous through the blood of Jesus Christ will eternally be blessed by sharing in God's riches. He promised to open his good treasure to those who obey His commands.

Sunday Psalm: A Prayer for God's Mercy

Psalm 4


1 Hear me when I call, O God of my righteousness: thou hast enlarged me when I was in distress; have mercy upon me, and hear my prayer. 2 O ye sons of men, how long will ye turn my glory into shame? how long will ye love vanity, and seek after leasing? Selah. 3 But know that the LORD hath set apart him that is godly for himself: the LORD will hear when I call unto him. 4 Stand in awe, and sin not: commune with your own heart upon your bed, and be still. Selah. 5 Offer the sacrifices of righteousness, and put your trust in the LORD.
6 There be many that say, Who will shew us any good? LORD, lift thou up the light of thy countenance upon us. 7 Thou hast put gladness in my heart, more than in the time that their corn and their wine increased. 8 I will both lay me down in peace, and sleep: for thou, LORD, only makest me dwell in safety.



Psalms 4:1-8 (KJV)

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Saturday, July 27, 2013

Read Through the Bible in 2013: July 29-August 3

Take Ten

7/29/2013      Isaiah 14, 15 Revelation 14, 15
7/30/2013      Isaiah 16-18 Revelation 16, 17
7/31/2013      Isaiah 19-21 Revelation 18, 19
8/1/2013      Isaiah 22, 23 Revelation 20, 21
8/2/2013      Isaiah 24-26 Revelation 22
8/3/2013      Isaiah 27, 28 Psalms 1, 2


For more information concerning the book of Psalms click this link.

Journal Through the Bible: Week 29 Thursday

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Deuteronomy chapters 25 and 26

Does God issue any commands in this passage?

  • (25:1-3) Courts were to be fair to judge. The wicked were to be punished but not above beatings of 40 stripes.
  • (25:4) The oxen were not to be muzzled while they worked to grind the corn.
  • (25:5-10) The laws of the kinsman-redeemer were explained. If a man died childless his brother was to marry the wife of the deceased and have children by her. The first child was to inherit the name and property of the deceased. If the brother did not want to marry her the widow would remove the shoe of the brother and spit in his face. 
  • (25:11-12) A woman could not deliver her husband in a fight by grabbing the secret parts of the opponent. Her punishment was to have her hand cut off.
  • (25:13-16) No one was to have in their possession weights that were fraudulent and imprecise for the purpose of cheating.
  • (25:17-19) The Amalekites were to be annihilated for their sins toward Israel and toward God. Specifically mentioned was killing the elderly and feeble.
  • (26:1-15) The people were reminded that in the third year they were to begin tithing the first fruits by taking them to the Levites. Included in the ceremony was a reciting of the history from the time of Jacob unto the present so that they would not forget all that blessings they had received. There was also to be a time of confession and supplication for continued blessings.
  • (26:16-19) The people were commanded to remember that they had vowed to be a peculiar people separated for the worship of God and that God had vowed to take them as His people.

Does God make any promises?

  • Having true weights and measures brought the promise of living long on the land.
  • God promised that His people would be holy, praised, and honored among all the other nations.

Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • Jesus is our kinsman-redeemer. It is by Him that we inherit all that belongs to God. Jesus is our kinsman because He came in the flesh and dwelt among us, but since He was without sin He was able to redeem us for Himself.
  • Jesus is the honored of Israel, its prime dignitary.

Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Someday we will live on the inheritance that our kinsman-redeemer obtained for us.
  • God has not forgotten His people. Someday they will again be exalted above all nations.

Journal Through the Bible: Week 29 Wednesday

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Deuteronomy 23:24-24:22

Does God issue any commands in this passage?
  • (23: 23-24) Passersby were allowed to eat the produce from the fields and vineyards they passed along the way; however, they were not allowed to pick enough to take home! (God made provisions for everyone who might be away from home to eat when there was nowhere to buy dinner!)
  • (24:1-4) Although divorce was not God's plan for marriage, He commanded that a few guidelines be followed if it happened. 1. There was to be a written (legal) notice given to the wife being sent away. 2. The divorced wife was allowed to marry another man. 3. If the marriage to the second husband ended by either divorce or death the woman could not remarry her first husband.
  • (24:5) Newlywed husbands were exempt from military or business (perhaps jury duty or building roads?) for 1 year.
  • (24:6) A man's tools of the trade could not be taken for collateral against a loan.
  • (24:7) A man found guilty of kidnapping another Hebrew and selling him into slavery would be sentenced to death.
  • (24:8-9) They were to be diligent to watch for signs of leprosy.
  • (24:10-13) No one could enter another man's house to obtain collateral but the lender had to wait outside. And if the man was poor the lender was to give back the collateral.
  • (24:14-15) Hired servants were to be paid at the end of their day of labor.
  • (24:16) A father would not be put to death for the crimes of his son and the son would not be put to death for the crimes of his father. Each person was responsible for his own sin.
  • (24:17-18) Judgment against widows, orphans, and foreigners was to be fair and honest. No one was allowed to prey on them because of their weakness. 
  • (24:19-22) Parts of the field, vineyard, and olive harvests were to be left specifically for the widows, orphans, and foreigners to gather.

Does God make any promises?

  • The implied promise of 23:23-24 is that if the people obeyed Him and followed His commandments God would so abundantly provide the necessary crops that a farmer would never miss the grapes or ears of standing corn that anyone passing by might pick for their own consumption.
  • God would reward those who were kind to a poor person who could not afford collateral. (24:13)
  • God promised that He would hear the prayers of oppressed hired servants and would count it as sin against the man who was slow to pay the wages that he owed. (24:15)

Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • Jesus' disciples became hungry on the Sabbath day and picked grain from a field they were passing. The Pharisees used this action to start a controversy concerning the Sabbath day. Jesus used it to teach that He was Lord over even the Sabbath day. (See Matt. 12:1-8; Mark 2:23-28; Luke 6:1-5)
  • The "commandment" of 24:1-4 concerning divorce was one of the "hard questions" that the Pharisees asked Jesus, hoping to trip Him up in His theology. Jesus made it clear that it was not God's plan that any should divorce but that He knew it would happen due to the sinfulness and hardness of hearts so He set guidelines concerning it.
  • (24:16) Jesus saves each of us individually. We cannot take be punished for one another. Only Jesus' death was the substitute for the sins of another.



Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • The implication made multiple times in this passage is that God always abundantly provides even for those of us who were once strangers to Him. In eternity, whatever God wants us to eat will always be available and we will be able to eat freely.
  • The implication is that God's covenant with a believer is like a marriage contract, but unlike a contract between humans the contract between God and the believer will never result in anyone being "put away" (divorce).



Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 29 Tuesday

This post was updated on 7/25. I am at church camp this week so not only are the journal pages running late but they are not always complete when I post them. Credit it to busyness and sleep deprivation.
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Deuteronomy 22:13-23:23

This is a long list of ordinances that Moses delivered to the people. Most of the items are mentioned for the first time.

Does God issue any commands in this passage?
  • Israelite men who bargained with a father for that man's maiden daughter might make accusations about the daughter's virtue after the consummation of the marriage so commandments were set into place to safeguard the reputations of everyone involved. If the accusation was not true and the family could produce the tokens of the woman's purity (including a blood stained cloth) the elders of the city who stood as judges over the case would fine the husband 100 shekels of silver to be paid to the father for the slander of the daughter. The husband could never be granted a divorce from the woman but would be required to meet the marriage requirements. If the accusation was found to be true the daughter would be put to death for the sin of prostitution.
  • Adulterers were to be put to death.
  • Rapists of engaged women were to be put to death.
  • A betrothed woman who is attacked in the city would also be put to death if she did not cry out for help but a betrothed woman that lived in the country would not be punished.
  • A man who raped a woman who was not married or betrothed would pay a fine to the father of 50 shekels and he would be required to keep the woman as his wife.
  • A man could not take his father's wife.
  • Men who sustained in their private parts were not to enter the congregation.
  • The descendants of an illegitimate child could not enter the congregation through the tenth generation.
  • An Ammonite or Moabite could never enter the congregation because of the way they treated the Children of Israel on their journey between Egypt and Canaan.
  • They were not to hate the Edomites because of the family relationship and they were not to hate the Egyptians because they had given them sanctuary during the time of famine. Their children could enter the congregation in their third generation.
  • The soldiers of Israel were to keep themselves from wickedness.
  • Relieving oneself was to take place outside the camp and human waste was to be buried.
  • An escaped slave was not to be returned to his owner but was to be allowed to live wherever he desired.
  • The daughters of the Israelites were not to be prostitutes and their sons were not to be sodomites.
  • The price of a prostitute or the price of a dog were not to be used to pay for vows before God.
  • They were not to lend money with interest to other Israelites but they could lend with interest to other nationalities.
  • They were to keep their vows and pay what they promised.

Does God make any promises?
  • The LORD promised that He would keep track of the vows made and require them to be fulfilled.
  • God said that He would turn away from them if there was uncleanliness in their camp.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?
  • God stated that He walked through their camp. This could be in reference to the Angel of the Lord that was leading them (and whom I feel is Jesus) or perhaps it is just His presence in the camp. Either way, Jesus is present there.
  • God stated that He did not want to see any unclean thing in their camp because He would then turn away from them. Jesus is the One that cleanses from all unrighteousness so that God the Father does not turn away from us.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?
  • Nothing that I identified.

Monday, July 22, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 29 Monday

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Deuteronomy 21:1-22:12

Does God issue any commands in this passage?
  • If someone was found dead the judges of the people were to question the inhabitants of the nearby villages to see if they could determine who had killed the person. The elders of the city were to take a heifer into an unimproved valley and kill it. (See Genesis 15:9 and Numbers 19:1-22 for heifers killed for purification.) The elders of that town would swear an oath that the citizens had nothing to do with the death.
  • A woman captive was to cut her nails and shave her head. She would be given new clothing and would be allowed to grieve her dead relatives for a month before becoming the wife of the man who held her captive. If the man did not wish to keep her as his wife he was to allow her to leave and settle wherever she desired. He was not allowed to keep her as a slave.
  • Men who had multiple wives could not make the firstborn of a beloved wife the one that inherited the double portion over the true firstborn.
  • Those who had riotous and drunkard sons that would not obey their parents even after correction and punishment were to deliver them to the elders of the city and have them put to death.
  • Those who were hanged on a tree were to be taken down by nightfall and buried. They were accursed.
  • Lost animals or other possessions were to be restored unto their owners once those owners could be determined.
  • They could not turn away if they saw a neighbor needing help.
  • Men and women were not to masquerade as one another by wearing each other's clothing.
  • Mother birds and baby birds or eggs could not be taken at the same time. The young could be taken but the mother bird was to be left.
  • Protective railings were to be built around the rooftops of houses.
  • Seeds were not to be hybridized.
  • Plowing could not be done with an ox and donkey together.
  • Their garments were to have fringe upon their hems.

Does God make any promises?
  • Taking only the eggs or baby birds but leaving the mother brought a promise of prolonging their days.

Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?
  • Hebrews 9:13, 14 says that the blood of the heifer was for purification but that it is Jesus' blood that cleanses us from all unrighteousness
  • Rebellious sons were the antithesis of Jesus, the Holy One who always obeyed His father and did His will. 
  • Jesus was hung on a tree. He was accursed of God.
  • Jesus expanded the command to help a neighbor with the story of the Good Samaritan. 


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Not that I saw.

Sunday, July 21, 2013

TAKE TIME: Reading Assignment for July 22-27

Introduction: The instructions continue this week. Some of the topics covered concerned marriage, rebellion, and tithing.


Reading Assignment:
  • Monday - Deuteronomy 21:1-22:12
  • Tuesday - Deuteronomy 22:13-23:23
  • Wednesday - Deuteronomy 23:24-24:22
  • Thursday - Deuteronomy 25:1-26:19
  • Friday - Deuteronomy 27:1-28:14
  • Saturday - Deuteronomy 28:15-68


Memory Verse

Review the verses from recent weeks.


Prayer Journal (ACTS)
  • Adoration - This week take time each day to praise for His power.
  • Confession - Ask God to reveal hidden sin in your life and then confess it.
  • Thanksgiving - Thank God for His leadership. 
  • Supplication - What are your prayer requests this week? List them for future reference so that you can see how God answers.


Search the Scriptures

Look for references for each of the following:
  • Promises that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?
  • References that either refer to or infer something about future events.
  • What does this passage teach about Jesus?
  • Commandments that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?


Putting the Word into Action

Some of the commandments that God gave the people through Moses concerned taking care of the poor, the widows, and the orphans. Although we do not leave parts of our fields unharvested for them to glean we can make donations of food to them, perhaps by taking them to someone that you know personally.

Sunday Psalm: A Refuge for the Oppressed

Psalm 9

1 I will praise thee, O LORD, with my whole heart; I will shew forth all thy marvellous works. 2 I will be glad and rejoice in thee: I will sing praise to thy name, O thou most High. 3 When mine enemies are turned back, they shall fall and perish at thy presence. 4 For thou hast maintained my right and my cause; thou satest in the throne judging right. 5 Thou hast rebuked the heathen, thou hast destroyed the wicked, thou hast put out their name for ever and ever. 6 O thou enemy, destructions are come to a perpetual end: and thou hast destroyed cities; their memorial is perished with them. 7 But the LORD shall endure for ever: he hath prepared his throne for judgment. 8 And he shall judge the world in righteousness, he shall minister judgment to the people in uprightness.9 The LORD also will be a refuge for the oppressed, a refuge in times of trouble. 10 And they that know thy name will put their trust in thee: for thou, LORD, hast not forsaken them that seek thee.

11 Sing praises to the LORD, which dwelleth in Zion: declare among the people his doings. 12 When he maketh inquisition for blood, he remembereth them: he forgetteth not the cry of the humble. 13 Have mercy upon me, O LORD; consider my trouble which I suffer of them that hate me, thou that liftest me up from the gates of death: 14 That I may shew forth all thy praise in the gates of the daughter of Zion: I will rejoice in thy salvation.15 The heathen are sunk down in the pit that they made: in the net which they hid is their own foot taken.16 The LORD is known by the judgment which he executeth: the wicked is snared in the work of his own hands. Higgaion. Selah. 17 The wicked shall be turned into hell, and all the nations that forget God. 18 For the needy shall not alway be forgotten: the expectation of the poor shall not perish for ever. 19 Arise, O LORD; let not man prevail: let the heathen be judged in thy sight. 20 Put them in fear, O LORD: that the nations may know themselves to be but men. Selah.


Psalms 9:1-20 (KJV)

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Saturday, July 20, 2013

Read Through the Bible in 2013: July 22-27

Take Ten

7/22/2013      II Kings 15-17 Revelation 4
7/23/2013      Isaiah 1, 2 Revelation 5, 6
7/24/2013      Isaiah 3-5 Revelation 7, 8
7/25/2013      Isaiah 6-8 Revelation 9
7/26/2013      Isaiah 9, 10 Revelation 10, 11
7/27/2013      Isaiah 11-13 Revelation 12, 13


For more information concerning the Old Testament book of Isaiah click this link

Journal Through the Bible: Week 28 Saturday

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Deuteronomy 19:1-20:20

Does God issue any commands in this passage?

  • God commanded them to separate 3 cities of refuge on the western side of the Jordan River and stated that if they inhabited the whole land that was promised them they should separate 3 cities on the eastern bank also.
  • Those found guilty of premeditated murder would be delivered to the avenger of blood so that the sentence of death could be executed.
  • A neighbor's landmark was not to be removed. This would be stealing the family inheritance.
  • A man could only be condemned by the testimony of at least 2 witnesses. One witness was not enough to convict a man.
  • A false witness would suffer the punishment meant for the man he wished to condemn once his duplicity was revealed.
  • The people were not to fear the enemies that appeared mightier than they. Those who had just built a new house, or purchased a new vineyard, or become engaged to a wife would be excused from battle. After that those who were fearful were to be excused so they would not have an opportunity to discourage others.
  • The soldiers were to first offer peace to a city (those afar off and not of the cities of the Canaanites, Hittites, Amorites, Perizzites, Hivites, and Jebusites) and if the city accepted the terms of peace the inhabitants would become servants. If they did not accept the terms the city would be besieged and the male inhabitants killed.
  • Only trees that did not bear edible fruit could be used to make bulwarks against the besieged cities.


Does God make any promises?

  • By starting this passage with the word "When" God is promising to destroy the nations in Canaan and give their land to the Hebrews.
  • When giving the instructions concerning the people who would gain admittance to a city of refuge God promised safety from the avenger.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • The cities of refuge are a picture of Christ. We are guilty of killing another (the guilt of Jesus' death is laid upon us) and yet we can run to Him for refuge until the time of judgment where we will be declared "not guilty" and freed from the one who wishes us harm. Jesus is also our High Priest whose death set us free from the penalty of our deeds and the avenger cannot touch us.
  • The law stated that a man could only be condemned through the word of at least 2 witnesses but none of the witnesses at Jesus' trial could agree on the evidence. He was thus wrongly accused even by the requirements found in the Jews' laws.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Someday God will make war against His enemies and Jesus will lead the charge. He will have no need of bulwarks when laying siege. Revelation tells us that His weapon will be a two-edged sword, or the words of His mouth, since scripture is also called God's Word and is described as a two-edged sword.

Friday, July 19, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 28 Friday

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Deuteronomy 17:1-18:22

Does God issue any commands in this passage?

  • They were not to sacrifice blemished animals to God.
  • Anyone who worshiped the sun, moon, or stars was to be put to death.
  • Capital offenses were not to be carried out unless there were at least 2 or 3 witnesses to the offense. The witnesses were to be the first to carry out the punishment.
  • Hard to judge situations were to be taken to the priests, Levites, and judges. Whatever sentence the judge declared would stand. Those who refused to follow the sentence would die.
  • Knowing that they would one day decide to set a king over their government God gave them standards for choosing one. A king was to be one of the Hebrews. He was not to possess a large amount of horses nor cause the people to return to Egypt. He was not to have a harem nor was he to desire large riches. He was to write out a copy of the Pentateuch for himself and read it every day so that he would learn to fear the LORD and follow His statutes.
  • The Levites were to have no inheritance of land but were to receive their upkeep through the offerings of the people. The LORD was their inheritance.
  • The people were forbidden to take part in the religious rites of the Canaanites. This included sacrificing children, or using divination, or astrology, or witchcraft, or consulting spirits. This is why God was removing the Canaanites from the land!
  • False prophets were to be put to death. The test of a prophet was 100% accuracy.


Does God make any promises?

  • Obedient kings would prolong their rule in Israel.
  • God promised to raise up a Prophet from the Hebrew people who would speak the words given Him. (18:15)


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • Jesus meets all the standards for the King of Israel. He was not a foreigner, but was of the seed of Abraham. He never amassed wealth in any way while on the earth, including that of large stables of horses, nor wives, nor money. He was the son that was called out of Egypt but He did not lead the people back to Egypt and into slavery. As a matter of fact, Egypt represented bondage and Jesus went into bondage for sinners but will not allow those who have been redeemed to go back into it. He also wrote the Pentateuch (it is His Word!) and He follows the commands of God. 
  • Jesus is the obedient King whose rule will be prolonged in Israel. Actually, it will last forever!
  • Jesus was the Prophet God promised to send who would speak His words to the people and would lead them.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Someday the obedient King Jesus will take the throne of Israel and will reign forever.
  • Like the Levites, we have no inheritance in this world now because the LORD is our inheritance. We are citizens of God's Kingdom.

Thursday, July 18, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 28 Thursday

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Deuteronomy 15:12-16:22

Does God issue any commands in this passage?

  • A Hebrew man or woman was not to be enslaved by a Hebrew owner longer than 7 years. And when the time of servitude had elapsed the person was to be given flocks and provisions in order to establish himself in the land. (This response was to be a memorial to their slavery in Egypt and their redemption by LORD Who brought them out with adequate provisions.)
  • If the Hebrew man or woman servant did not want to be freed s/he was to have his/her ear pierced.
  • The firstlings of the flocks and herds were not to be beasts of burden nor shorn but were to be set apart for the LORD to be offered and eaten in the designated place of worship. (The blood was not to be eaten.)
  • They were to observe the ceremonies in the month Abib as a remembrance of the exodus from Egypt.
  • After the corn harvest came Pentecost. This was to be a celebration of the harvest.
  • They were to remember to observe the Feast of Tabernacles to commemorate their days of living in tents in the wilderness on the journey between Egypt and Canaan.
  • The males were to appear before the LORD three times a year at His appointed place (this place would later be the Temple in Jerusalem): The Feast of Unleavened Bread, the Feast of Weeks (Pentecost or the Feast of Firstfruits), and the Feast of Tabernacles (Ingathering). No man was to go to the appointed place without an offering.
  • Judges and courts were to be appointed in every city. Judgment was to be just.
  • No trees were to be planted near God's altar nor was there to be any image or idol near it.


Does God make any promises?

  • The LORD realized that it might be hard for owners to allow their Hebrew slaves to leave so He promised that He would bless the man who freed his brother from service.
  • Maintaining proper justice and judgment would bring blessings upon the people.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • We were enslaved by sin but we have been bought with a price. Now we belong to Jesus! We do not seek to be freed from His ownership (His yoke is easy and His burden is light) so the Holy Spirit seals us. (See Ephesians 1:7-14)
  • Jesus observed the required feasts and presented Himself at the Temple. 
  • The feasts represented Jesus. The Feast of Unleavened Bread was part of Passover and represented the sinless Messiah offered for sinful people; The Feast of Weeks (Pentecost or Firstfruits) took place during the harvest which represented the redeemed being thankful for the resurrection of the Messiah (the early church meeting in Jerusalem experienced ordaining by the Holy Spirit on the first Pentecost following Jesus' death, resurrection, and ascension); and the Feast of Tabernacles which represented the temporary dwelling being replaced with a permanent one. (For the Messiah it would mean the resurrection of His body and for us it means our future resurrection with the giving up of this temporary tabernacle in which we dwell, the mortal body, for the perfect immortal one.)
  • Jesus told His followers that the fields were white unto harvest and that we are the laborers He sends into the field. (John 4:35)


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?
  • The Feast of Weeks is a picture of the resurrection. Jesus conquered death, hell, and the grave for us so we will also be resurrected!
  • The Feast of Tabernacles will be celebrated in eternity (see Zechariah 14:16) by the redeemed because WE ARE THE HARVEST! 

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 28 Wednesday

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Deuteronomy 14:1-15:11


Does God issue any commands in this passage?

  • The people of God were to be different than the heathens around them and God gave them specific examples of what that meant. For one thing, they were not to cut or mutilate themselves in any way for those who had died.
  • Another thing that separated them from the heathen nations was their dietary laws. The foods that they could eat and the manner in which they could eat them were listed. Fowl and animals that were predatory or scavengers were not to be eaten. Nor were they to eat the animals they were on the allowable list if these had died for some unknown reason (this would be to keep them free from whatever illness killed the animal).
  • The people were to tithe of their seed and of the produce they grew and of the herds with which they were blessed. They were to bring them to the tabernacle, or if that was too far they were to sell those goods and take the money and buy something in the town where the tabernacle was located and give the priests the substituted offering.
  • Once again, they were told not to neglect the Levites because that tribe had no inheritance but was totally dependent upon the people for their support.
  • At the end of every third year they were to take the tithe of their increase and open a free food store for the orphans, widows, and the Levites who could then take as much as they wanted.
  • At the end of every seventh year they were to release all debtors. They could not return to indentured servanthood a Hebrew who had been released but they could require foreigners to pay off what was owed. The exception was when there would no longer be anyone poor within the borders. No one would be indentured any longer so there would be no need to release anyone from their debts.


Does God make any promises?

  • If the people followed God's plan for caring for each other there would be so many blessings upon them that there would no longer be a poor person among them.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • The third year of free provisions is a picture of Jesus, the member of the Trinity that freely gives us access to Heaven's storehouse. (See Isaiah 55:1)
  • The seventh year of release from debts is a picture of Jesus, the Perfect One that makes us citizens of God's Country and frees us from our debt of sin. Since we are citizens and no longer foreigners we cannot be indentured again!

Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • In God's economy no one is poor or goes hungry because He provides. (See 15:4) This is a picture of what life will be like in eternity.  There will be abundance and no one will need to be released from their debts because those who live in Heaven and on the New Earth will already have been freed, meaning from their sin debts. All of God's Storehouse will be open to them!

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 28 Tuesday

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Deuteronomy 12:1-13:18

Does God issue any commands in this passage?

  • The people were told to completely destroy the groves and altars that the Canaanites built for their idols as well as breaking the idols themselves.
  • In 12:8 God commanded them not to do "that which is right in [your] own eyes" (and yet that is exactly the theme phrase of the book of Judges) but in the place where God chose to put His name was where the people were to come to worship and bring their offerings.
  • Ceremonial eating was to take place in specific places but personal hunting and eating were allowed anywhere (while following the proper dietary laws).
  • They were to make sure that they did not neglect the care and support of the Levites.
  • They were not to follow prophets who led them to worship gods. It was a test of their faithfulness. False prophets were to be put to death.
  • Even family members who attempted to entice their loved ones to worship false gods were to be put to death.
  • If a city of Israel turned to idol worship the rest of the nation were to put the inhabitants to death and destroy the city with the spoils.


Does God make any promises in this passage?

  • Obedience meant blessing, including expanding the borders of the nation.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • God told the people that He had chosen a place to put His name and that this was where they were to worship. This was the topic that the woman at the well in Samaria wanted to debate with Jesus. He told her that salvation was of the Jews and that the time was coming when worship would not take place in either Jerusalem or Samaria but that true worship was of God is in spirit and in truth and that this is what God truly desired.
  • God gave the people precepts (or commands) for worship and daily living. Actually, even the commands given for daily living were so they would be a holy people who worshiped God. I John 5:1-5 says that those who love God keep His commandments and those commandments are not meant to be grievous but protection. And those who love God love His Son, Jesus, also.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • These commands will not be necessary in eternity. All who live will love the LORD and willingly serve Him.

Monday, July 15, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 28 Monday

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And it shall come to pass, if ye shall hearken diligently unto my commandments which I command you this day, to love the LORD your God, and to serve him with all your heart and with all your soul, That I will give you the rain of your land in his due season, the first rain and the latter rain, that thou mayest gather in the corn, and they wine, and thine oil. Deut. 11:13-14

Deuteronomy chapter 11

Does God issue any commands in this chapter?

  • Through Moses the people are commanded to love the LORD their God because of His goodness to them. (He made it clear that he was talking to those who had left Egypt as young people so they had witnessed the mighty miracles and not to those who had been born in the wilderness who had not seen what God had done for them.)
  • The people were commanded to teach the ways of the LORD to their children so that they might also prosper in the land in due time.


Does God make any promises?

  • If the people would love the LORD their days in the land that flowed with milk and honey and received abundant rainfall would be prolonged.
  • If the people would love the LORD He would continue to send the early and latter rains.
  • Obedience would result in having the LORD fight the battles for possession of the land.
  • Through Moses God set before them a blessing and a curse. He would bless them if they obeyed His commandments and a curse if they did not. The blessing was to be put upon Gerizim and the curse upon Mount Ebal.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • Not directly, but the New Testament teaches that Jesus will be the King of the Jews when they finally possess their inheritance.
  • Jesus is also the LORD that they were to worship. He claimed to be the I AM ("Before Abraham was, I AM" in John 8:58.)


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Moses makes it quite clear that the land of promise was an area that God loved exceedingly and He keeps a constant eye on it. If that land meant that much to God in the past it must also be loved by Him still today and will be loved by Him forever. (I think prophecy bears this out. Even His capital city is called "New Jerusalem."
  • Moses states again the borders of the land of promise. Did they ever fully possess it? I don't think they did. The closest they came was during Solomon's reign. Someday this prophecy will be completely fulfilled and the Jews will possess their whole inheritance promised to them. Moses promised it (see verse 31 where he said, "ye SHALL possess it..."

Sunday, July 14, 2013

TAKE TIME: Reading Assignment for July 15-20, 2013

Introduction: The Children of Israel were still encamped upon the plain of Moab and receiving instruction from Moses before his death. Last week we read where he reminded them of the Ten Commandments. This week we will read where he told them of the ceremonial and  personal laws concerning diet and hygiene.


Reading Assignment:
  • Monday - Deuteronomy chapter 11
  • Tuesday - Deuteronomy 12:1-13:18
  • Wednesday - Deuteronomy 14:1-15:11
  • Thursday - Deuteronomy 15:12-16:22
  • Friday - Deuteronomy 17:1-18:22
  • Saturday - Deuteronomy 19:1-20:20


Memory Verse

For thou art an holy people unto the LORD thy God, and the LORD hath chosen thee to be a peculiar people unto himself, above all the nations that are upon the earth.  Deuteronomy 14:2


Prayer Journal (ACTS)
  • Adoration - This week take time each day to praise God for being just.
  • Confession - Ask God to reveal hidden sin in your life and then confess it.
  • Thanksgiving - Thank God that He provided righteousness for the unjust. 
  • Supplication - What are your prayer requests this week? List them for future reference so that you can see how God answers.


Search the Scriptures

Look for references for each of the following:
  • Promises that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?
  • References that either refer to or infer something about future events.
  • What does this passage teach about Jesus?
  • Commandments that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?


Putting the Word into Action
Some of the things being reviewed by Moses to the next generation of Israelites concerned the blessings of the harvest along with the dietary laws. There are many harvest blessings now of fruits and vegetables to be picked and processed. This is a good time of the year to make a donation to a food pantry or to personally take food to someone who might need it.

Sunday Psalm: Praise God for Being His Chosen

Psalm 33

1 Rejoice in the LORD, O ye righteous: for praise is comely for the upright. 2 Praise the LORD with harp: sing unto him with the psaltery and an instrument of ten strings. 3 Sing unto him a new song; play skilfully with a loud noise. 4 For the word of the LORD is right; and all his works are done in truth. 5 He loveth righteousness and judgment: the earth is full of the goodness of the LORD. 6 By the word of the LORD were the heavens made; and all the host of them by the breath of his mouth.7 He gathereth the waters of the sea together as an heap: he layeth up the depth in storehouses. 8 Let all the earth fear the LORD: let all the inhabitants of the world stand in awe of him. 9 For he spake, and it was done; he commanded, and it stood fast. 10 The LORD bringeth the counsel of the heathen to nought: he maketh the devices of the people of none effect. 11 The counsel of the LORD standeth for ever, the thoughts of his heart to all generations.

12 Blessed is the nation whose God is the LORD; and the people whom he hath chosen for his own inheritance. 13 The LORD looketh from heaven; he beholdeth all the sons of men. 14 From the place of his habitation he looketh upon all the inhabitants of the earth. 15 He fashioneth their hearts alike; he considereth all their works. 16 There is no king saved by the multitude of an host: a mighty man is not delivered by much strength. 17 An horse is a vain thing for safety: neither shall he deliver any by his great strength. 18 Behold, the eye of the LORD is upon them that fear him, upon them that hope in his mercy; 19 To deliver their soul from death, and to keep them alive in famine. 20 Our soul waiteth for the LORD: he is our help and our shield. 21 For our heart shall rejoice in him, because we have trusted in his holy name. 22 Let thy mercy, O LORD, be upon us, according as we hope in thee.



Psalms 33:1-22 (KJV)

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Saturday, July 13, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 27 Saturday

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Deuteronomy chapter 10

This chapter is a continuation of the review that Moses gave the Children of Israel concerning the years since leaving Egypt. Yesterday's passage told how God loved them. Today's chapter tells them to love God.
And now, Israel, what doth the LORD thy God require of thee, but to fear the LORD thy God, to walk in all his ways, and to love him, and to serve the LORD thy God with all thy heart and with all thy soul, To keep the commandments of the LORD, and his statutes, which I command thee this day for thy good?  Deut. 10:12-13
This is what God requires of all who want to enter into a covenant relationship with Him.


Does God issue any commands in this chapter?

  • Moses reminded them of the commandments that God engraved upon the tablets of stone.
  • Moses reminded them of God's command to separate out the tribe of Levi for His service.
  • Moses reminded them that God commanded him to lead them toward the Land of Promise once he had come down from the mount after meeting with the LORD.
  • Through Moses God made it clear that it was their hearts that needed circumcised. 
  • The people were commanded to love and care for strangers since they had been strangers in the land of Egypt when Jacob and his family went down to dwell there.
  • The people were commanded to fear God and cling to him.


Does God make any promises?

  • God delighted in their fathers (Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob) and would bless them because of that delight.
  • God promised to be the judge that cared for the fatherless, widows, and strangers.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • The same question found in verses 12 and 13 is the same statement that Jesus called the first and greatest commandment. 
  • Men are incapable of keeping this first and greatest commandment. Jesus makes us acceptable to take part in the covenant relationship with God and paid the penalty when we fail to keep our part of the covenant.
  • Moses told the people to care for strangers. Jesus cares for those of us that are alien to the ways of God.
  • Jesus also said that the second greatest commandment was to love thy neighbor as thyself. This is an echo of Moses' sentiment to care for the strangers among them.


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • "Behold, the heaven and the heaven of heavens is the LORD'S thy God, the earth also, with all that therein is." (Verse 14). Nothing is going to happen to this earth or the skies that God does not allow. Nothing will ever surprise God! Just as God's fingerprint is all over history it is also all over the earth's future. 

Read Through the Bible in 2013: July 15-20

Take Ten

7/15/2013      Hosea 6, 7 I John 3, 4
7/16/2013      Hosea 8-10 I John 5
7/17/2013      Hosea 11, 12 II John
7/18/2013      Hosea 13, 14 III John
7/19/2013      Jonah 1, 2 Revelation 1, 2
7/20/2013      Jonah 3, 4 Revelation 3


For more information concerning the Old Testament book of Jonah, and the New Testament books of II John, III John and Revelation click this link.