Monday, September 30, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 39 Monday

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I Samuel chapter 16

Samuel had just told Saul that his family would not rule as a dynasty in Israel because of Saul's own sinful nature and he had just executed the Amalekite king, Agag. Now he was to go to Bethlehem to anoint God's chosen from among the sons of Jesse. He never anticipated that God would decline the tall and impressive-looking sons for the young son who kept the sheep!

God's Holy Spirit departed from Saul and an evil spirit tormented him. This is reminiscent of the time when God removed His protective hedge from Job so that Satan could torment and test him. Saul did not fare nearly as well as Job did when tested. When Saul sent for David to play for him he probably had no idea at that time that David was God's chosen successor to Saul's throne because Saul immediately loved David and promoted him to armorbearer. This may have been God's way of putting David in a position to learn about the affairs of state.

Does God issue any commands in this chapter?

  • God told Samuel to stop grieving for Saul, fill a horn with oil, and go to Bethlehem for the purpose of anointing one of the sons of Jesse as the next king.
  • God told Samuel to take a heifer with him to Bethlehem to sacrifice. Then he was to call Jesse and his family to the sacrifice.
  • God told Samuel not to look on the outward appearance of the sons of Jesse because God was looking at their hearts.
  • God told Samuel to anoint the youngest son of Jesse, David the shepherd.


Does God make any promises?

  • He promised that the next king would be a man after His own heart.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • David is the ancestor of Jesus and he is also a type of Christ. David was the obedient son who kept his father's sheep. Jesus is the obedient son who keeps His Father's sheep.


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • We are introduced to David, the ancestor of Jesus the Messiah who will rule and reign (Isaiah chapter 11.)
  • In this passage David is the anointed king who had not yet taken possession of the throne of the territory he was going to rule (Israel). Jesus is the anointed King who has not fully taken possession of the territory that He will rule (the whole world).


Psalm 23

Does this psalm teach anything about Jesus?

  • Jesus, the LORD, is the shepherd of His people who provides rest, provisions, restoration, righteousness, protection on the journey, medical aid, and blessings forever.


Does this psalm teach anything about yet-future events?

  • The Shepherd's sheep will live in his house forever. Wherever the Shepherd lives, the sheep will live also.

Sunday, September 29, 2013

TAKE TIME: September 30 - October 5, 2013

Introduction: Things did not go well with King Saul so God chose another king, a man after His own heart. That set up a series of cat-and-mouse games between the current king Saul and the future king David.

 Assignment:
  • Monday - I Samuel chapter 16; Psalm 23
  • Tuesday - I Samuel chapter 17
  • Wednesday - I Samuel chapter 18
  • Thursday - I Samuel chapter 19; Psalm 59
  • Friday - I Samuel chapter 20
  • Saturday - I Samuel chapter 21; Psalm 56


Memory Verse

Memorize Psalm 23 if you have not already done so.


Prayer Journal (ACTS)
  • Adoration - This week take time each day to praise God for being omniscient. Nothing escapes His notice. He even sees within our hearts.
  • Confession - Ask God to reveal hidden sin in your life and then confess it.
  • Thanksgiving - Thank God for any answers to your prayers.
  • Supplication - What are your prayer requests this week? List them for future reference so that you can see how God answers.


Search the Scriptures

Look for references for each of the following:
  • Promises that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?
  • References that either refer to or infer something about future events.
  • What does this passage teach about Jesus?
  • Commandments that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?


Putting the Word into Action

Continue to pray for your elected officials. If local elections will be held this fall in your area spend time this week praying over the issues and the candidates. Ask God to help you make wise decisions and to vote for people who have a heart for God if at all possible.

Sunday Psalm: The Transgression of the Wicked Versus the Excellence of the Righteous

Psalm 36

1 The transgression of the wicked saith within my heart, that there is no fear of God before his eyes. 2 For he flattereth himself in his own eyes, until his iniquity be found to be hateful. 3 The words of his mouth are iniquity and deceit: he hath left off to be wise, and to do good. 4 He deviseth mischief upon his bed; he setteth himself in a way that is not good; he abhorreth not evil.

5 Thy mercy, O LORD, is in the heavens; and thy faithfulness reacheth unto the clouds. 6 Thy righteousness is like the great mountains; thy judgments are a great deep: O LORD, thou preservest man and beast. 7 How excellent is thy lovingkindness, O God! therefore the children of men put their trust under the shadow of thy wings. 8 They shall be abundantly satisfied with the fatness of thy house; and thou shalt make them drink of the river of thy pleasures. 9 For with thee is the fountain of life: in thy light shall we see light. 10 O continue thy lovingkindness unto them that know thee; and thy righteousness to the upright in heart. 11 Let not the foot of pride come against me, and let not the hand of the wicked remove me. 12 There are the workers of iniquity fallen: they are cast down, and shall not be able to rise.


Psalms 36:1-12 (KJV)


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Saturday, September 28, 2013

Read Through the Bible in 2013: Sept. 30 - Oct 5

Take Ten

9/30/2013      Jeremiah 43-45 Psalm 64
10/1/2013      Jeremiah 46-48 Psalm 65
10/2/2013      Jeremiah 49, 50 Psalm 66
10/3/2013      Jeremiah 51, 52 Psalm 67
10/4/2013      Daniel 1, 2 Psalm 68
10/5/2013      Daniel 3, 4 Psalm 69
For more information on the Old Testament book of Daniel click here.

Journal Through the Bible: Week 38 Saturday

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I Samuel chapter 15
And Samuel came to Saul: and Saul said unto him, blessed be thou of the LORD: I have performed the commandment of the LORD. And Samuel said, What meaneth then this bleating of the sheep in mine ears, and the lowing of the oxen which I hear? .And Saul said, They have brought them from the Amalekites: for the people spared the best of the sheep and of the oxen, to sacrifice unto the LORD thy God; and the rest we have utterly destroyed. . . . And Samuel said, Hath the LORD as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, as in obeying the voice of the LORD? Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, and to hearken than the fat of rams. For rebellion is as the sin of witchcraft, and stubbornness is as iniquity and idolatry. (15:13-15, 22-23a)

Does God issue any commands in this chapter?

  • Through Samuel God told Saul to destroy the Amalekites and all of their possessions.


Does God make any promises?

  • God promised another king to take the place of Saul.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • Samuel says that the Strength of Israel, whom is God which includes Jesus, does not repent in the way that men repent. He changes the direction of men because of their sin but He does not sorrow over any sins that He has committed. In the case of Saul's dynasty, God was going to change the direction of Israel by giving them another king.


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • The world is now governed by those who look good on the outside much like Saul did (even Satan is described as an angel of light) but one day it will be governed by a Man about whom the prophet Isaiah said that he has no comeliness that we should desire Him.

Journal Through the Bible: Week 38 Friday

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I Samuel 14:15-52

Saul's son, Jonathan, and Jonathan's armor bearer won a great victory against the Philistines. While they were away fighting, Saul pronounced a foolish curse upon anyone who ate that day. This made the people weak and hungry. But Jonathan, who had not heard the curse, ate of the honey that was dripping from the trees. The result of this curse was that the people killed sheep and oxen won from the Philistines and ate them without regard for the commands in the law that state the proper manner of disposing of the animal blood. Another result is that Saul would have slain Jonathan for eating the honey except that the people protected him from his father. Because of the vow and Jonathan's ignorant sin, the LORD would not answer Saul's question concerning further pursuit of the Philistines. The battle ended prematurely and the Hebrews went home.  He turned his attentions then to throwing off the yokes of Moab, Ammon, Edom, Zobah and Amalek.

Does God issue any commands?

  • God does not speak in this passage.


Does God make any promises?

  • God does not speak.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • Jonathan is a godly man but he sins ignorantly not knowing that his own father had pronounced a curse upon all who would eat anything that day. Jesus never sinned ignorantly but He took the curse that His Father pronounced upon the world. The curse that Saul pronounced upon the Hebrews was foolish but the curse that God pronounced upon mankind is justified. The death of the beloved son was the penalty in each situation. In Jonathan's case, his sentence was not carried out because the people demanded it not be. In Jesus' case, His sentence was carried out because the people demanded it.


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • None that I identified.

Friday, September 27, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 38 Thursday

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I Samuel 13:5-14:14

This passage does not say how much time had passed between Saul's coronation and the sacrifice incident but within a very few chapters we read of Saul's appointment to the throne and the pronouncement that God would not allow him to establish a dynasty. Yet several years had to have transpired.

Does God issue any commands?

  • God does not speak directly in this passage but He had previously given the job descriptions for kings and priests. These are not interchangeable for mere men but Saul seems to have mistaken himself to be the Sovereign of the universe and did the tasks of both offices.


Does God make any promises?

  • Through Samuel God promises to remove the kingdom from Saul and give it to someone with God's own heart.

Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • Even though Saul was a type of Christ as the appointed King of Israel he was not perfect as was Jesus. Saul overstepped his authority and fulfilled duties reserved for the priests. On the other hand, Jesus is both King and Priest who is able to fulfill the duties of each because He was appointed them by His Father, God. Saul was the king but He was not the Sovereign who could do anything he wished as could Jesus, the God-Man who truly is the Sovereign of the universe. .


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Jonathan told his armor bearer that God can just as easily win a battle with a few men as well as with many. Jesus told His disciples that straight is the gate and narrow is the way and few there be that find it. One day the few that find the narrow way will comprise the army of God and they will be used of Jesus to finally defeat the wicked. 

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 38 Wednesday

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I Samuel 12:1-13:4

Samuel gave the people a quick history lesson beginning with the time of the Exodus up through the time of the judges and into his own time. He is now an old man although he still has many years to live. (He died in the latter years of Saul's reign and Saul reigned about 40 years.) Then he showed them an awesome display of God's power.

Does God issue any commands?

  • Now that they have passed into the era of being led by a king instead of judges and prophets to whom God spoke directly, the command to follow and obey the LORD was mentioned once again.


Does God make any promises?

  • Samuel showed them divine power by calling down thunder and rain. Then after the people were frightened and confessed their sin of asking for a king Samuel told them that God had promised not to forsake them.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • Not that I identified.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Not that I identified.

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 38 Tuesday

Picture taken at the Wright Patterson Air Force Museum, Dayton, OH
I Samuel 10:17-11:15

Saul was introduced as the first national King of Israel and his first official duty was to rescue the men of Jabesh-Gilead from the Ammonites who demanded to put out their right eyes and make them slaves as opposed to putting them death. Remember Jabesh-Gilead? Read Judges chapter 21 again if you need a reminder. Most likely the men of Jabesh-Gilead were Saul's relatives.

Saul rallied the troops by sending the body parts of oxen throughout the land with the threat that he would slaughter the oxen of anyone who did not respond to the call to arms. He probably had heard tales of the Levite who dismembered and distributed the woman in such a way that it brought all of Israel against Saul's own tribe of Benjamin many years earlier. The oxen were a reminder that the tribes that responded would have no recourse but to punish those that didn't. This appeal worked.

Did God issue any commands in this passage?

  • Through Samuel God had each tribe and family and household to present themselves before Him so that He could tell them who He had chosen as their first king. Then God had to tell them where Saul had hidden himself since he didn't seem to want to be acknowledged as the king.


Did God make any promises?

  • Through the victory over the Ammonites and the rescue of the men of Jabesh-Gilead God confirmed His promise to be with Israel's king and use him to deliver His people from their enemies.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • As king of Israel Saul is a type of Jesus. When the King calls His troops into service they must be ready to heed his instructions.
  • When Saul sent the message throughout Israel he told them to follow himself and Samuel. When the two persons of Saul and Samuel are combined they represent the offices of Jesus. Samuel is prophet, judge, and high priest. Saul is the king. Jesus is all four of these: Prophet, Judge, High Priest, and King.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • The King is calling His troops to battle. We are already the Lord's Army battling spiritual wickedness in high places now but one day we will be rallied for the final, quick, and decisive battle. All who are not for the King are against Him and will be punished according to their deeds.

Monday, September 23, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 38 Monday

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I Samuel 9:1-10:16

Does God issue any commands in this passage?

  • God told Samuel the day before Saul and his servant arrived at the village where Samuel was holding a sacrificial feast that they were coming and that Samuel was to anoint Saul as king of Israel.


Does God make any promises?

  • God promised to use Saul to deliver Israel from the Philistines.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • All of the kingly preparations made for Saul are a foretaste and reminder of the preparations God has made for Jesus, the eternal King of Israel.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Samuel anointed Saul but Saul did not immediately take possession of the kingdom because everyone and everything were not yet prepared for his kingdom. God has already anointed Jesus as the King but He has not returned to reign yet because not everything and everybody has been fully prepared according to God's plan. When all has been made ready Jesus will reign as the only King forever.


Got Wrinkles? Meet Downy Wrinkle Releaser!


Ironing not your thing? Mine either! And yet there are so many clothes that pass through our laundry each week that demand more attention than what the permanent press cycle on the clothes dryer can give them. 
Or maybe the damp towel tossed in with a second go-around. 
Or even what the steam can do when the item is hung in a steamy bathroom while the person who plans to wear it showers.

Oh, yeah. I know a lot of tricks for getting out wrinkles. Let me tell you about my favorite one:

Downy Wrinkle Releaser

I was introduced to this product earlier this summer by an independent marketing group. Really. I had never heard of it before.

I then participated in a 2-part product and packaging test. To say that this product has saved our family time and trouble would be an understatement. 

All three of the occupants of this house know how to wash and dry our khakis and dress clothes but none of us seems to know how to get those same clothes onto hangers immediately after the dryer stops. We could buy a new dryer that comes with a buzzer. Or we could continue to use Downy Wrinkle Releaser

Uh, we opt for the latter. Less expensive, and yet it works just as well. There's absolutely no guarantee that we would hang up the clothes immediately after the buzzer sounded anyway. Just being honest here. :)

Downy Wrinkle Releaser also comes in a travel size. I'll have the small bottle in my suitcase when I travel by air. I already know from my trip earlier this month that the full-size travels well by car. That was not part of the "official" trial, but it was my own personal one. Just as I thought, we either needed the in-room iron or we needed Downy Wrinkle Releaser. 

Let's just say that the iron in the motel room kept its cool. And so did we.

***I received remuneration in cash and product in exchange for my opinions during the test period. The idea to share some of my opinions here was purely my own decision.


TAKE TIME: September 23-28, 2013 Reading Assignment

Introduction: This week the historical narrative of the nation of Israel transitions from the era of theocracy with its God-appointed judges to the kingdom period with its monarchy. We will read about when Samuel, the last judge of Israel anointed Saul, the first king of Israel, and of Saul's reign.

 Assignment:
  • Monday - I Samuel 9:1-10:16
  • Tuesday - I Samuel 10:17-11:15
  • Wednesday - I Samuel 12:1-13:4
  • Thursday - I Samuel 13:5-14:14
  • Friday - I Samuel 14:15-52
  • Saturday - I Samuel chapter 15


Memory Verse

For the LORD will not forsake his people for his great name's sake: because it hath pleased the LORD to make you his people.    I Samuel 12:22


Prayer Journal (ACTS)
  • Adoration - This week take time each day to praise God for being the world's true Ruler. He allows others to govern under Him, but it is His world and His Kingdom.
  • Confession - Ask God to reveal hidden sin in your life and then confess it.
  • Thanksgiving - Thank God for any answers to your prayers.
  • Supplication - What are your prayer requests this week? List them for future reference so that you can see how God answers.


Search the Scriptures

Look for references for each of the following:
  • Promises that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?
  • References that either refer to or infer something about future events.
  • What does this passage teach about Jesus?
  • Commandments that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?


Putting the Word into Action

This week we will read about governmental rule, something with which we are all familiar. We will see that human governments are faulty, which will become abundantly evident as our study of King Saul progresses. God allows even wicked men to rule sometimes as a means of punishing His subjects or as a way of getting their attention but the Bible is clear that governments and rulers are ordained by God. This week make it a point to find out who it is that has the rule over you. Begin at the municipal, township, or school board level and make your way up the chain to your national leaders. Then pray for them! (This may not seem like much of a "social action" compared to some of the other things we have done but praying for people by name and for their specific needs and job obligations can be harder than writing a check or physically helping in some way.)

Sunday, September 22, 2013

Sunday Psalm: Godly Men Are Gone!

Psalm 12

1 Help, LORD; for the godly man ceaseth; for the faithful fail from among the children of men. 2 They speak vanity every one with his neighbour: with flattering lips and with a double heart do they speak. 3 The LORD shall cut off all flattering lips, and the tongue that speaketh proud things: 4 Who have said, With our tongue will we prevail; our lips are our own: who is lord over us? 5 For the oppression of the poor, for the sighing of the needy, now will I arise, saith the LORD; I will set him in safety from him that puffeth at him. 6 The words of the LORD are pure words: as silver tried in a furnace of earth, purified seven times. 7 Thou shalt keep them, O LORD, thou shalt preserve them from this generation for ever. 8 The wicked walk on every side, when the vilest men are exalted.


Psalms 12:1-8 (KJV)

Bible Explorer software

Saturday, September 21, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 37 Saturday

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I Samuel 7:1-8:22

A few weeks ago Pastor Dad said in a sermon that Samuel made a grievous error when he appointed his sons as judges over Israel. This was something that only God had done previously and even then only in response to the need for deliverance following a time of repentence. Judgeship was not intended to be passed down through family lines like the dynasty of a monarchy. The people were wrong to petition God and Samuel for a king but Samuel had added to the reasons for the request when he appointed his prejudicial sons to a judicial office.

Does God issue any commands?

  • God told Samuel to grant the peoples' petition for a king because they had not primarily rejected Samuel but God Himself. If they had a grievance against Samuel's sons they should have petitioned God for relief and God would have dealt with the miscreants. God is their King but they had rejected Him and requested that they be like all the other nations.
  • God told Samuel to tell the people of the heavy taxation and work required by a monarch's government.


Does God make any promises?

  • God fulfilled His promise to fight for Israel if they would turn from idolatry and follow Him.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • As the judge of Israel, Samuel was a type of Christ.
  • Jesus is the King of Israel. They rejected Him in the days of Samuel, too.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Not that I identified.



Read Through the Bible in 2013: September 23-28

Take Ten
9/23/2013      Jeremiah 32, 33 Psalms 56, 57
9/24/2013      Jeremiah 34-36 Psalms 58, 59
9/25/2013      Jeremiah 37-39 Psalm 60
9/26/2013      Lamentations 1, 2 Psalm 61
9/27/2013      Lamentations 3-5 Psalm 62
9/28/2013      Jeremiah 40-42 Psalm 63


For further information concerning the Old Testament book of Lamentations click this link.

Journal Through the Bible: Week 37 Friday

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I Samuel 5:1-6:21

The God who chose the Ark of the Covenant to represent His relationship to the Children of Israel did not show His presence to the Children of Israel when the Ark was in their possession but He did when the Ark was in the possession of the Philistines. God's hand was heavy on their god and on their bodies. Things got so bad that the Israelites did not need to fight another battle in order to retrieve the Ark. The Philistines gladly sent it back after 7 months of disease and destruction! But first, they devised a trial to see if it was God that was afflicting them or if it was only chance.

Does God issue any commands in this passage?

  • God had previously given instructions concerning the handling of the Ark of the Covenant. The men of Bethshemesh trespassed by looking into it when it was returned by the Philistines. Only the appointed priests and Levites were to handle the Ark and its contents.


Does God make any promises? 

  • No, God did not speak.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • The Ark of the Covenant was a picture of the relationship between God and man as sanctified by the sacrifice of the Lord Jesus Christ. The men of Bethshemesh did not handle the Ark in a worthy manner. The Apostle Paul later reminded the Christians at Corinth that we are to take the Lord's Supper, which is a covenant sign between God and man sanctified by the sacrifice of the Lord Jesus Christ, worthily. In other words, it is to be done properly in the right manner as instructed by God.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Not that I identified.

Friday, September 20, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 37 Thursday

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I Samuel chapter 4

The Children of Israel had lived such a bad testimony before their neighbors that the Philistines mistakenly thought when the Ark of the Covenant came into their enemy's camp that they had brought their "Gods in a box" with them. Unfortunately, the Children of Israel thought the same thing and that is why they had carried it there in the first place. But God cannot be contained in a box, nor can He be summoned like a genie in a lamp.
The glory is departed from Israel, said the dying mother of the newborn grandson of Eli.

Does God issue any commands in this chapter?

  • No, but because His commands were not being obeyed He let the Philistines take the Ark of the Covenant and defeat Israel just as He promised He would do if His people broke their covenant with Him.


Does God make any promises?

  • No, but God kept a few promises. Namely, He had promised the people that if they broke the covenant He would allow their enemies to defeat them in battle. He also had promised Eli that his sons would both die on the same day as a sign to Eli that God had rejected his descendants from high priestly duties. The grandson of Eli that was born that very day, Ichabod, was aptly named by his dying mother.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • Jesus is God and He cannot be summoned or ordered around using the icons and symbols that represent Him. In this case the Hebrews had made the Ark of the Covenant to be their idol even though it was to be a holy representation of the covenant relationship between God and His people. Many emblems and icons of Christianity are wrongly used and have become idols. These include but are not limited to the cross, the baby Jesus, and even the ordinances of baptism and the Lord's Supper which were given to the Lord's churches as symbols of their covenant relationship with Him.


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Not that I identified.

Thursday, September 19, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 37 Wednesday

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I Samuel 3:2-21

God revealed Himself to Samuel when he was a young man. He later revealed Himself again to Samuel in Shiloh.

Does God issue any commands in this chapter?

  • No, even though God spoke directly with Samuel there are no commands made.


Does God make any promises in this chapter?

  • God spoke audibly to Samuel, an occurrence that was very rare (see 3:1). He told Samuel that everyone would be astonished on the day that He brought all the promised curses to pass upon the house of Eli. God went so far as to say that the sins of Eli's house would not be forgiven even by the giving of sacrifices and offerings. (This seems to indicate that this family would not be restored to their place of priestly preeminence even if future family members petitioned God for that honor.)

Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • Samuel is a type of Christ. In this chapter he is established as a prophet of the LORD. (verse 20)


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Not that I identified.

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 37 Tuesday

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I Samuel 2:12-3:1

The last verse of today's passage says that the word of God was precious because there was no open vision. Looking back through the notes for the book of Judges and the 300+ years that it covered it can seen that God actually spoke to very few individuals during that time including the judges and their families. Hearing directly from God truly was a rare and precious event!

Does God issue any commands in this passage?

  • Through "a man of God"God pronounced judgment upon the descendants of Eli because they had not followed His commands concerning sacrificial worship and the offerings of the people. As a matter of fact, Eli's sons had made the people hate coming to the tabernacle for their worship services.


Does God make any promises?

  • A man of God appeared to Eli (perhaps it was a prophet or an angel or a theophany) that rebuked him because he had abused his office as priest and had put his sons ahead of the worship of God (that's idolatry). Eli was reminded of the promises made by God to have the descendants of Aaron stand before Him in the priesthood but was told that his branch of the family would wither and die. A sign of confirmation was given to Eli: his two sons would die on the same day. Then a faithful line would be raised up to take the priesthood. Eli's descendants would beg for a job in the service of the tabernacle just so they could eat of the portion of food allotted to the priests. (This seems to be a punishment designated to fit the crime for which Hophni and Phinehas were guilty of stealing food from the people.)


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • Samuel, the much-loved child, was the firstborn of several children in the family of Elkanah and Hannah. Eli blessed them and prayed that God would add more children to their family because of the ministry of Samuel. Jesus, the beloved Son of God, is the first in the Family of God. Because of Him, we are added as His brothers and sisters to the Family.
  • As Samuel grew he obtained favor with both the LORD and with men. The same can be said for Jesus during His childhood and years of early ministry.
  • God told Eli that the faithful priestly line would walk before "mine anointed" forever. This was most likely a dual reference to both Samuel and Jesus, God's anointed.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Not that I identified.

Monday, September 16, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 37 Monday

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I Samuel 1:1-2:11

Samuel, the son of Elkanah, was a Levite descended from Levi's son, Kohath, just as Moses and Aaron were. You can find his lineage given in I Chronicles 6:31-38 in the list of the musicians guild. His name is given as Shemuel and his grandson was Heman, a musician under King David.

I love the question that Elkanah asked Hannah in 1:8, "Am not I better to thee than ten sons?" And I love Hannah's answer. She didn't say a word but she arose immediately after the meal and went to the tabernacle where she poured out her grief to the LORD. Her answer is obvious.

Hannah vowed a vow that would directly affect her son his whole life. He was to live at the tabernacle and he was to be a Nazarite. He had very little say in the matter, at least until he came of age. By that time he must have been told many times about his mother's grief, her faith, her request, and God's answer.

Today's reading concludes with Hannah's song of praise. I wonder if her great-grandson, Heman, put it to music for King David? :)

Does God issue any commands in this passage?

  • God had previously issued the conditions of vows, specifically concerning those made by women. Elkanah had the authority to negate Hannah's vow without having it charged to her as sin but he confirmed it to both Hannah and the LORD. (See 1:23)


Does God make any promises?

  • God did not speak, but the fact that He granted Hannah's request showed definite promise!


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • Samuel was "asked of God" just like the requested deliverer of Israel and he was given as the answer to prayer.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Hannah said it well in her song of praise: The LORD maketh poor, and maketh rich: he bringeth low, and lifteth up. He raiseth up the poor out of the dust, and lifteth up the beggar from the dunghill, to set them among princes, and to make them inherit the throne of glory: for the pillars of the earth are the LORD'S, and he hath set the world upon them. (2:7-8) Hannah knew that she had received one blessing from God and would one day inherit the very throne of glory.

Sunday, September 15, 2013

TAKE TIME: September 16-21, 2013 Reading Assignment

Introduction: Samuel was the last judge of Israel. His tenure as judge of Israel ended with the start of the nation's monarchy. Samuel began life as the much-beloved son of Hannah and he remains a much beloved Biblical figure today.


Reading Assignment:
  • Monday - I Samuel 1:1-2:11
  • Tuesday - I Samuel 2:12-3:1
  • Wednesday - I Samuel 3:2-21
  • Thursday - I Samuel chapter 4
  • Friday - I Samuel 5:1-6:21
  • Saturday - I Samuel 7:1-8:22


Memory Verse

For this child I prayed; and the LORD hath given me my petition which I asked of him.    I Samuel 1:27


Prayer Journal (ACTS)
  • Adoration - This week take time each day to praise God for being the One who hears and answers prayers. No one else has that ability.
  • Confession - Ask God to reveal hidden sin in your life and then confess it.
  • Thanksgiving - Thank God for any answers to your prayers.
  • Supplication - What are your prayer requests this week? List them for future reference so that you can see how God answers.


Search the Scriptures

Look for references for each of the following:
  • Promises that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?
  • References that either refer to or infer something about future events.
  • What does this passage teach about Jesus?
  • Commandments that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?


Putting the Word into Action

Things may not always be what they seem. When the broken-hearted Hannah appeared in the tabernacle the priest, Eli, thought that she was acting drunk and irreverent. Grief has a way of changing how someone looks and acts. Everyone you encounter carries hard burdens at some point in their life. If you notice someone acting out of character pray for them then ask if they need help.

Sunday Psalm: A Cry for Deliverance

Psalm 44

1 We have heard with our ears, O God, our fathers have told us, what work thou didst in their days, in the times of old. 2 How thou didst drive out the heathen with thy hand, and plantedst them; how thou didst afflict the people, and cast them out. 3 For they got not the land in possession by their own sword, neither did their own arm save them: but thy right hand, and thine arm, and the light of thy countenance, because thou hadst a favour unto them. 4 Thou art my King, O God: command deliverances for Jacob. 5 Through thee will we push down our enemies: through thy name will we tread them under that rise up against us. 6 For I will not trust in my bow, neither shall my sword save me. 7 But thou hast saved us from our enemies, and hast put them to shame that hated us. 8 In God we boast all the day long, and praise thy name for ever. Selah.
9 But thou hast cast off, and put us to shame; and goest not forth with our armies. 10 Thou makest us to turn back from the enemy: and they which hate us spoil for themselves. 11 Thou hast given us like sheep appointed for meat; and hast scattered us among the heathen. 12 Thou sellest thy people for nought, and dost not increase thy wealth by their price. 13 Thou makest us a reproach to our neighbours, a scorn and a derision to them that are round about us. 14 Thou makest us a byword among the heathen, a shaking of the head among the people. 15 My confusion is continually before me, and the shame of my face hath covered me, 16 For the voice of him that reproacheth and blasphemeth; by reason of the enemy and avenger.

17 All this is come upon us; yet have we not forgotten thee, neither have we dealt falsely in thy covenant. 18 Our heart is not turned back, neither have our steps declined from thy way; 19 Though thou hast sore broken us in the place of dragons, and covered us with the shadow of death. 20 If we have forgotten the name of our God, or stretched out our hands to a strange god; 21 Shall not God search this out? for he knoweth the secrets of the heart. 22 Yea, for thy sake are we killed all the day long; we are counted as sheep for the slaughter. 23 Awake, why sleepest thou, O Lord? arise, cast us not off for ever. 24 Wherefore hidest thou thy face, and forgettest our affliction and our oppression? 25 For our soul is bowed down to the dust: our belly cleaveth unto the earth. 26 Arise for our help, and redeem us for thy mercies' sake.


Psalms 44:1-26 (KJV)

Imported with Bible Explorer software

Saturday, September 14, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 36 Saturday

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Ruth 3:1-4:22

When Boaz told the nearer kinsman about the land of Elimelech that needed a redeemer the man expressed interest in it until he heard that it came with Ruth the Moabitess with whom he must marry and have children. (I recently heard an excellent sermon by an evangelist friend concerning the plucked off shoe in this passage. The shoe represents rejection by one suitor and desire by the other. Ruth probably kept that shoe in her jewelry box all of her life.)

Apparently Ruth was a young woman and Boaz was an older man. He praised her for not trying to catch the eye of any of the young men of the area.

Does God issue any commands in this passage?

  • God does not speak, but in this passage we read of the kinsman-redeemer command being obeyed.


Does God make any promises?

  • God does not speak but we read of the promise blessing being realized when the kinsman-redeemer command is followed.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • The nearer kinsman did not want to be associated with Ruth, an unclean Gentile, but Boaz accepted her as she was and changed her status. Jesus is like Boaz. We are unclean in our sins but he accepts us and changes our status in the sight of God.
  • The lineage at the end of chapter 4 tells of the descent of King David back to Boaz and Ruth. Jesus descended from King David so He is also descended from them.
  • The women rejoice with Naomi that the LORD did not leave her without a kinsman that restores life. As our kinsman-redeemer Jesus does the same for us.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • The kinsman-redeemer will be the restorer of our life also. Someday all believers will be resurrected and restored to life.


Read Through the Bible in 2013: September 16-21 Schedule

Take Ten

9/16/2013      Jeremiah 16-18 Psalm 49
9/17/2013      Jeremiah 19-21 Psalm 50
9/18/2013      Jeremiah 22, 23 Psalm 51
9/19/2013      Jeremiah 24-26 Psalm 52
9/20/2013      Jeremiah 27-29 Psalm 53
9/21/2013      Jeremiah 30, 31 Psalms 54, 55

Friday, September 13, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 36 Friday

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Ruth 1:1-2:23

Ruth is such a beautiful picture of the Christian's life. She knows she is an outsider but she desires to become one of the people of God through grace. She is acknowledged by a wealthy man (who is both Jew and Gentile) to whom she is related by law and by whom she receives protection and provision. Then she labors while it is day and does not rest until evening. Afterward she shares what she has received with another.

Does God issue any commands in this passage?

  • God does not speak in this passage, however we do see that the command that God formerly gave to the Children of Israel through Moses concerning the kinsman-redeemer concept for protecting a person's inheritance was understood by Naomi and her daughters-in-law.
  • The concept of working for welfare was also one that the LORD had commanded through Moses.


Does God make any promises?

  • God does not speak in this passage but the promise of provision and inheritance through a kinsman-redeemer had already been promised when God spoke through Moses. God also promised protection through that same kinsman.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • The speech of entreaty that Ruth made to Naomi is one that is often repeated during wedding ceremonies between a bride and groom. It would also make a nice prayer to the Savior. Even the part about death applies. It is appointed unto us to die once physically but always to die to self and sin. Jesus died in each of these ways here on the earth
  • In this passage Boaz is only introduced as a kinsman of Elimelech. He is a kind man who offers protection and provision. As our kinsman (meaning taking on flesh and being born into a human family) Jesus is our wealthy relative who protects and provides.
  • The speech that Ruth made as she bowed before Boaz when he first spoke to her is also one that every person should pray. "Why have I found grace in thine eyes, that thous shouldest take knowledge of me, seeing I am a stranger?" (2:10) He knew he was related to her by law but she did not possess that knowledge.
  • Just as Ruth was comforted by Boaz's speech telling her that she should remain in his field so that he could provide for her and Naomi and that he was aware that she had left her own family in Moab and had subsequently cared for Naomi, one of God's people, so does Jesus comfort Christians who have left behind everything familiar in the world and joined with God's people in their work. 
  • Boaz is himself a picture of Jesus, not only as the kinsman but in his ancestry. Jesus is both God and man. This was necessary because as God He was incapable of sin but as man He was tempted just as we are. Boaz was both Jew and Gentile, one of the Chosen and also one of the Canaanites (Rahab of Jericho was his mother).
  • Again, Boaz is clearly a picture of the Messiah as can be seen from Naomi's praise. She stated that the LORD had blessed them with a kinsman who was kindly disposed toward helping both the living and the dead.



Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Jesus told His disciples that where He went they could not go at that time but they would follow Him at a later time. Whither [He] goest, [we] will go, and where [He] lodgest, [we] will lodge; [His] people will be [our] people and [His] God [our] God. And so shall we ever be with the Lord.
  • The replying speech that Boaz made to Ruth telling her that her good deeds had been noticed and rewarded by God is similar to what the Apostle Paul stated about good works after salvation being rewarded when we first meet Jesus face to face as our kind judge.

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 36 Thursday

This post title was edited. I was so excited to be done with Judges that I totally forgot to put which week it is!

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Judges chapter 21

Today concludes the reading of the book of Judges. Whew! I'm ready for the book of Ruth!

Pay attention to the name of Jabesh-gilead in this chapter. It is one of the places where they got brides for the Benjamite men that remained alive. In a few weeks this village will be mentioned again in conjunction with Israel's first king, Saul, who was himself of the tribe of Benjamin.

Does God issue any commands in this chapter?

  • God does not speak.


Does God make any promises?

  • God does not speak.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • The last verse of the chapter and book, "In those days there was no king in Israel: every man did that which was right in his own eyes," is the antithesis of Jesus who followed Deuteronomy 6:18 instead, "And thou shalt do that which is right and good in the sight of the LORD: that it may be well with thee . . ."


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • In this book there were judges of all walks of life, including prophets, priests, and kings. (That would be Ahimelech.) These men were all faulty humans but someday there will be a Judge of all the earth who holds the offices of Prophet, Priest, and King.


Journal Through the Bible: Week 36 Wednesday

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Although we do not know the exact date of this event we know that Phinehas, the grandson of Aaron, was the high priest.

Judges chapter 20

Does God issue any commands in this chapter?

  • When consulted, God told the tribes to set the battle in array against Benjamin.


Does God make any promises?

  • God promised to deliver Benjamin into the hands of the other tribes on the third day of battle. The other two days had resulted in defeat even though God had told them to go. The deaths could have been a judgment because of all the wickedness of all the tribes during this era of Jewish history or it could have been that God was waiting for them to make the proper sacrifices (such as is mentioned in verse 26) before giving them victory.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • When asked whom should be the leading tribe against the Benjamites God told them that Judah would lead the charge. Judah is the chosen tribe because it is from Judah that the Lion of Israel, the King of Israel, would descend.
  • Victory did not come until the third day and then only after great sacrifices, fasting, and weeping. Jesus was victorious on the third day but only following His great sacrifice and the fasting and weeping of His followers. Victory over sin is given as a free gift to us but it cost dearly.


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Nothing that I identified. 

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 36 Tuesday

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Judges chapter 19

This must be one of the most revolting chapters in all of Scripture! There is little that one can say except what the Bible itself says about it:
And it was so, that all that saw it said, There was no such deed done nor seen from the day that the children of Israel came up out of the land of Egypt unto this day: consider of it, take advice, and speak your minds.   Judges 19:30
The events related in this chapter took place in Gibeah, the village of Saul's birth. This chapter tells of behind the scenes events that affected his ancestors.

Does God issue any commands in this chapter?

  • God does not speak.


Does God make any promises?

  • God does not speak.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • In a way, the old man who gave lodging to the Levite and his entourage was a type of Christ when he took them in and provided all of their necessities. He also attempted to keep them separated from the wickedness around them. 


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Not that I identified.