Thursday, July 31, 2014

Repurposing An Unused Dog Kennel

Once upon a time we had a dog named Pepper that required a high chainlink kennel for fresh air, sunshine, exercise, and potty breaks. We still have the dog named Pepper but several years ago we installed an invisible fence to meet those needs. It was a win-win for Pepper and her people!

But what to do with the unused kennel?
  • Let others borrow it. ü  I was happy with this arrangement. At least I wasn't looking at it anymore!
  • Lean it against the side of the house for a few years until we figure out what to do with it? ü  I was very unhappy with arrangement! I saw it every time I walked out into the backyard, which is often.
  • Let it assume a new identity as an enclosed vegetable garden. üüü  I am very happy with this arrangement!
We haven't had a real garden since we moved here 15 years ago because of issues with shade and wildlife. Especially wildlife. I think our yard is known as a 5 star Cervidae Smorgasbord where the plants are favored delicacies. Couple that with a backyard that has 90% shade cover and where the other 10% contains enough buried cables and pipes that the sunny area looks like a weird Candyland path every time the "Call Before You Dig" guys show up and it becomes obvious why we could not have a vegetable garden in our yard.

Until now.

I'm not sure why we didn't think of this before:


The garden in a sunny spot away from the shady areas of the backyard and protected from the deer

Green beans, pumpkins, peppers, cucumbers, leaf lettuce, tomatoes, watermelon, sunflowers, sage, and a mystery seed planted in its own pot by our grandson make up the spring/summer planting (photos taken in early July)

First we laid overlapping rows of garden weed block down and tucked it under the fence edges. Not everyone would need to do this but we did for many reasons that I won't go into right now. Eventually there will be enough raised beds and straw paths to hold it in place. (Oops! I see grass peeking through in these pictures.)

Our kennel is an approximate 9' x 9' so we plan to build 5 raised beds that are 2' x 4' each which will be positioned around the walls with gaps between for placing freestanding pots. We will leave the space near the gate clear and we plan to let the fruit from vines nest in the center area. The Smart Pot (*note: NOT an affiliate link) will stay right where it is along the side near the gate.

"Farmer Fen" watering the growing produce! (photos: late July)

He's posing for the camera and planning a bit of mischief!

While Gram inspects the damage done by the deer to cucumber vines hanging outside of the fence "Fen" sneaks up on her and sprays her with the water hose! (She got even. Both dried quickly in the summer sunshine.)

Cascading pumpkin vines

Healthy pepper plants

We got a late start this year, having not put this idea into production until mid-June, but everything is growing happily and healthily. I obviously over-planted. Something about those who sow sparingly reap sparingly came to mind. (See II Corinthians 9:6.) We could always prune out weak plants! We don't seem to have any weak plants so that is why the nesting area rapidly became covered with vines and delayed the need for purchasing straw.

We plan to build 2 of the remaining 3 raised beds before the fall planting. The other one will wait until next year when the self-watering planters can be moved without harming their contents. Right now there is no room for the last raised bed box.

We also plan to place gutters along the top of the kennel with a downspout that feeds into a water barrel. The compost bin will then be relocated so that much of the garden's food and water supply will be nearby.

We bought weed block, wood for the raised beds, and a few bags of garden soil which we mixed with our compost made from the leaves of all those shade trees. That's how we lost a kennel and gained a garden. I couldn't be more pleased with the way it is working out, even if the deer do nibble anything that hangs outside of the fence. But who can blame them?!


*There are so many raised bed plans to be found online. We adapted the size to fit our needs. Each of our beds cost around $17.50. 


Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Journal Through the Bible: Week 76 Tuesday

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Jeremiah 42:1-43:13

Here is something that I found interesting in the opening verses of chapter 42. The people came to Jeremiah and asked him to pray "to the LORD thy God" (verses 2, 3, and 5) and Jeremiah replied by saying that he would pray "to the LORD your God" for them. He reminded them that Jehovah was their God, or at least He should have been! They seemed to have claimed Him - briefly - in verse 6 when they call Him "the LORD our God." They soon proved that they really did not consider Jehovah to be their God! As a result, Jeremiah found himself in Egypt under duress.


Does God issue any commands?

  • In answer to the prayer that Jeremiah made on behalf of the people, God told Jeremiah to tell them that He would protect the remnant that remained in the land but that they were not to go to Egypt! They were to trust God and not in the safety that they perceived they would find in Egypt.
  • In Egypt, God told Jeremiah to take large stones and hide them in the clay in the brick kiln near Pharaoh's palace. Then he was to tell the Jews that Nebuchadnezzar would conquer the Egyptians and would set his throne upon those stones.


Does God make any promises?

  • God promised to protect the remnant as long as they remained in Judah but He promised that the sword, pestilence, and famine would overtake them if they went to Egypt. They would not return to Judah.
  • God promised that Nebuchadnezzar would destroy the idols and idol houses of Egypt.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • Like Nebuchadnezzar, Jesus will destroy all false forms of worship and idolatry when He comes as triumphant conqueror and servant of God.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • God promised that Nebuchadnezzar would set his throne upon the stones hidden by Jeremiah signifying that God was going to set up Nebuchadnezzar as ruler over Egypt. God has promised that He will set up the throne of Jesus upon the earth and this prophecy will one day be fulfilled just as the prophecies concerning Nebuchadnezzar were. God sets up rulers and He takes them away. God's prophecies are always fulfilled because God keeps His promises.

Monday, July 28, 2014

Journal Through the Bible: Week 76 Monday

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Jeremiah 40:1-41:18

The Babylonian captain of the guard freed Jeremiah from prison and told him that "the LORD thy God" had pronounced evil upon the place, meaning Jerusalem. I think Jeremiah was in full agreement since he had heard it straight from God Himself years earlier. Jeremiah was sent to Mizpah. That is where Gedaliah, the governor that Nebuchadnezzar appointed, lived and governed. Gedaliah encouraged the people to harvest the fields and vineyards while awaiting word from the king of Babylon concerning their service to him. Nethaniah, a prince of Ammon, assassinated Gedaliah, the Jews that were with him, and the Chaldean men of war. (See also II Kings 25:22-26.)

Johanan, the son of Kareah, pursued Nethaniah and was able to free all that had been taken captive by him. These people settled near Bethlehem and were ready to flee into Egypt because they were afraid of the Chaldeans.

Does God issue any commands?

  • God did not speak to Jeremiah in this passage.


Does God make any promises?

  • God did not speak in this passage, but some of the former promises came true. For instance, Jeremiah had been promised that he would be safe after the siege and he was.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • Johanan was a type of Christ in this passage because he freed those taken captive by the murderer.


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Not that I identified.

Sunday, July 27, 2014

TAKE TIME: July 28 - August 2, 2014 Schedule

Note: Some of this schedule was originally posted for last week. The week 75 assignment has been revised.

Introduction: Jeremiah did not want to go to Egypt but he was forced to do so by the Jews that felt they were safer in Egypt than in the land of Judah. God had a ministry for Jeremiah there also.

 Assignment:
  • Monday - Jeremiah 40:1-41:18
  • Tuesday - Jeremiah 42:1-43:13
  • Wednesday -  Jeremiah 44:1-45:5
  • Thursday -Jeremiah 46:1-47:7
  • Friday - Jeremiah chapter 48
  • Saturday - Jeremiah chapter 49
Memory Verse

That the LORD thy God may shew us the way wherein we may walk, and the thing that we may do.  Jeremiah 42:3

Prayer Journal (ACTS)
  • Adoration - Praise God that He is omnipresent. It does not matter where we are; God is there!
  • Confession - Ask God to reveal hidden sin in your life and then confess it.
  • Thanksgiving - Thank God for any answers to your prayers.
  • Supplication - What are your prayer requests this week? List them for future reference so that you can see how God answers.
Search the Scriptures

Look for references for each of the following:
  • Promises that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?
  • References that either refer to or infer something about future events.
  • What does this passage teach about Jesus?
  • Commandments that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?
Putting the Word into Action

Jeremiah found himself in a foreign country, a place he did not want to be! And yet God had a ministry for him there, too. It's summer and vacation time is in full swing. Don't forget to let your faith be evident no matter where you find yourself!

Read Through the Bible in 2014: July 28 - August 2 Schedule


7/28/2014      Isaiah 11-13 Revelation 12, 13
7/29/2014      Isaiah 14, 15 Revelation 14, 15
7/30/2014      Isaiah 16-18 Revelation 16, 17
7/31/2014      Isaiah 19-21 Revelation 18, 19
8/1/2014      Isaiah 22, 23 Revelation 20, 21
8/2/2014      Isaiah 24-26 Revelation 22

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Journal Through the Bible: Week 75 Saturday

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Lamentations chapter 5

The final poem. Jeremiah appeals to God because of the abusive treatment the people received from their captors.
The joy of our heart is ceased; our dance is turned into mourning. (verse 15)


Does God issue any commands?

  • God does not speak.


Does God make any promises?

  • God does not speak.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • God's reign is eternal. Jesus is the eternal God that reigns. (verse 19)


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Jeremiah's prayer for restoration was answered when the remnant returned 70 years later but it will also be fulfilled when God renews Jerusalem's "days as of old." Jerusalem is where Jesus will reign and will abide with His people (the redeemed) forever.

Friday, July 25, 2014

Journal Through the Bible: Week 75 Friday

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Lamentations chapter 4

Jeremiah described the state of affairs in this 4th acrostic poem, one verse for each letter of the Hebrew alphabet. The city's resources, both its physical wealth and its people, are described as gold that has become marred.

As sheltered as most of us are who live in the western world, the descriptions of people, especially children, dying of hunger and thirst, is something with which we can only imagine. But Jeremiah points out that even those who once lived in luxury were experiencing the same distress. Read it and weep!

Does God issue any commands?

  • None that I identified. The events described in this chapter happened because God's previous commands had been ignored.


Does God make any promises?

  • Jeremiah addressed Edom with a prophecy of her own doom. This must have been something that he received of the LORD.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • Jesus is the LORD that accomplished His fury by destroying the foundations of Jerusalem.
  • Jesus is the LORD that will no longer carry the daughter of Zion into captivity.


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • The carnage of this chapter is similar to that which is described near the end of the book of Revelation.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Journal Through the Bible: Week 75 Thursday

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Lamentations chapter 3

This is the longest of Jeremiah's poems. Like the other four it is an acrostic but unlike the others there are three verses that begin with each of the 22 Hebrew letters. Verses 1-3 begin with aleph, verses 4-6 begin with beth, 7-9 begin with gimel, and so forth. Psalm 119 follows the same acrostic pattern. Of course the subject  matter and number of verses are completely different in Psalm 119 than the poems comprising the book of Lamentations but the poetic form is the same. Many printings of the Bible show the Hebrew letters above each stanza of Psalm 119 for those who would like to view the Hebrew alphabet.

It is of the LORD'S mercies that we are not consumed, because his compassions fail not. They are new every morning: great is thy faithfulness.  (verses 22 and 23)
This poem exhibits all of the elements of the ACTS of prayer. Examples of Adoration, Confession, Thanksgiving, and Supplication can be found within Jeremiah's deeply mournful - yet hopeful - piece.


Does God issue any commands?

  • God does not speak.


Does God make any promises?

  • God does not speak.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?
  • The loneliness and despair of being separated from God even in prayer, experiencing God's punishment for wickedness, being the target for God's bow and arrow, being scorned by his own people, and removing his soul from peace which are the testimony of Jeremiah are also the testimony of Jesus Christ at the time of His crucifixion.
  • Jeremiah remembered a time of communion with God and it gave him hope of God's future mercies. This is also the testimony of Jesus.
  • Knowing that there is coming a day when all things will be set right Jeremiah says that a man can bear the yoke, sit alone in silence, speak humbly, turn the other cheek to someone that attacks him. This was demonstrated by the life of Jesus and we are commanded by Jesus to live in such a way.
  • Jeremiah stated that although he was at his lowest, emotionally and physically, while enduring the suffering in the pit, God did not leave him there. Jesus endured the pit emotionally and physically also. He was in agony over His separation from God the Father while on the cross where He physically died. He was then placed within a pit in the earth but God did not leave Him there either.
  • Jeremiah called upon God to avenge him against His enemies. Jesus called upon God to forgive those who placed Him on the cross because they didn't know what they were doing. However, Jesus was avenging us and Himself of all our enemies because His death, burial, and resurrection defeated the real enemies: Satan, sin, and death. (We wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against . . . spiritual wickedness in high places. Ephesians 6:12)


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?
  • In desperate times Jeremiah still hoped in the LORD and in His promise of good times to come. This describes the life of the Christian who is awaiting the fulfillment of God's promised eternal kingdom.
It is good that a man should both hope and quietly wait for the salvation of the LORD. (verse 26)

  •  God does not cast off forever! He will have compassion according to the multitude of his mercies. The day is quickly approaching when His compassion toward His people will be openly demonstrated.
  • Jeremiah tells of the time when God would no longer allow sin to continue in Judah. He punished them for their rebellion and would no longer pardon their iniquity. One day time will run out on God's patience with the inhabitants of earth and the time allowed for repentance will end.

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Journal Through the Bible: Week 75 Wednesday (Revised)

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Lamentations chapter 2


Is this the city that men call The perfection of beauty, The joy of the whole earth? (verse 15; see also Psalm 48)

Does God issue any commands?

  • No, but verse 17 says that He fulfilled what He had commanded from the days of old.


Does God make any promises?

  • No, but verse 17 says that He had brought to pass all that He had devised, or promised, since the early days of the nation.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • Jesus is the Lord, the enemy that swallowed up all the habitations of Jacob and hath not pitied them. He also caused the Temple built for worship of Him to be destroyed because it was being used profanely. (verses 2-9)
  • The prophets, priests, and kings were all supposed to be pictures of the coming Messiah, Jesus, but since these people misused their offices the Lord, Jesus, punished them for the offense. (verses 6, 9, 14)


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • The city of Jerusalem appealed to God not to forget the apple of His eye (verse 18). Revelation makes it clear that God still regards Jerusalem in such a manner. That is why the capital on the New Earth will be New Jerusalem.

Journal Through the Bible: Week 75 Tuesday (Revised)

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Lamentations chapter 1

Does God issue any commands?

  • God does not speak.


Does God make any promises?

  • God does not speak, but the widowhood of the city spoken of by Jeremiah was promised by God when He told Judah that they had been an unfaithful spouse and He was no longer going to put her away. The captivity was a fulfillment of God's promise.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • Jeremiah wept over Jerusalem when he witnessed her judgment just as Jesus would do in the New Testament when He stood above her and lamented her hard heart.
  • Jeremiah stated that he was afflicted for Jerusalem (verse 12). Jesus was afflicted for Jerusalem.


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Not that I identified.

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Journal Through the Bible: Week 75 Monday

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Jeremiah chapter 39

Zedekiah had rebelled against paying tribute to Babylon so in Zedekiah's ninth year of reign on the throne of Judah Nebuchadnezzar, the king of Babylon, sent his armies against the capital city of Jerusalem. The siege lasted 1 1/2 years and then the walls were breached. Zedekiah, his family, and his men of war fled by night but they were caught and judgment was executed against them just as Jeremiah had said it would be. The kings sons were killed in front of him and his own eyes were put out. That was the price he paid for insubordination. The city walls were broken down and the palace and houses were consumed with fire. The king and the people were then taken to Babylon. Only the poorest of the people were left in the land. They were given vineyards to maintain as tenant farmers.

Jeremiah was given into the hand of the Babylonian captain of the guard for safe keeping. He took Jeremiah out of the prison where he had been kept and passed him into the care of Gedaliah.

Did God issue any commands?

  • While Jeremiah was still shut up in the prison, God told Jeremiah to speak to Ebedmelech the Ethiopian (see 38:7-13), the man who interceded to the king on behalf of Jeremiah when he was in the mire of the prison, to tell him that he had no reason to fear the conquerors because his life would be spared for his trust in the LORD.


Did God make any promises?

  • God promised Ebedmelech the Ethiopian that his life would be spared in the conquest of Jerusalem because of his trust in the LORD.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • Reference is made to an intercessor, Ebedmelech, who had made request for Jeremiah's life to the king when he was mired in the pit. Jesus makes intercessor to the King for all who are mired by sin and want to be released from its hold upon them!


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • God protected those who trusted in Him. Those who love and fear Him have no reason to fear the judgment to come. This is taught in I John 4:17-18. They have no need to fear judgment because perfect loves casts out fear. (We don't love perfectly, but God does!)

Monday, July 21, 2014

TAKE TIME: July 21-26, 2014 Schedule (Revised)

Note: This is a corrected schedule. Previous blog posts will be corrected to show this new chronology.

Introduction: Zedekiah did not take Jeremiah's advice and he paid the price for it. Things happened just as Jeremiah told him they would. Jeremiah wrote his thoughts in acrostic poems that we call the book of Lamentations. It is a mourning eulogy for the city of Jerusalem that laid in ruins.

 Assignment:
  • Monday - Jeremiah chapter 39
  • Tuesday - Lamentations chapter 1
  • Wednesday - Lamentations chapter 2
  • Thursday - Lamentations chapter 3
  • Friday - Lamentations chapter 4
  • Saturday - Lamentations chapter 5
Memory Verse

Is this the city that  men call The perfection of beauty, The joy of the whole earth? Lamentations 2:15b

Prayer Journal (ACTS)
  • Adoration - Praise God that He is a just Judge.
  • Confession - Ask God to reveal hidden sin in your life and then confess it.
  • Thanksgiving - Thank God for any answers to your prayers.
  • Supplication - What are your prayer requests this week? List them for future reference so that you can see how God answers.
Search the Scriptures

Look for references for each of the following:
  • Promises that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?
  • References that either refer to or infer something about future events.
  • What does this passage teach about Jesus?
  • Commandments that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?
Putting the Word into Action

Sometimes bad things happen to even Godly people and not because the individuals themselves have committed sinful acts. Such was the case of Jeremiah. Perhaps you know someone who is suffering just because they are citizens of this sinful world. Do you know of a way to help someone like this in their time of need?

Read Through the Bible in 2014: July 21-26 Schedule


7/21/2014      Jonah 3, 4 Revelation 3
7/22/2014      II Kings 15-17 Revelation 4
7/23/2014      Isaiah 1, 2 Revelation 5, 6
7/24/2014      Isaiah 3-5 Revelation 7, 8
7/25/2014      Isaiah 6-8 Revelation 9
7/26/2014      Isaiah 9, 10 Revelation 10, 11

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Our Kitchen Makeover

I have always wanted to makeover our little galley kitchen. Well, "always" meaning the 14+ years that we've lived here. We fully expected to make changes one day.

The kitchen had other plans. One day in February it said, "Today!"

That's when the bottom bank of cabinets collapsed. Collapsed! As in, the whole front had broken and the counter top was slanting toward the floor with all its contents balancing on tippy-toes to keep from plunging to the floor. It turns out that there were no "boxes" to our cabinets! Only a facade! The only reason the whole contraption stayed together for so long was because there were 3 drawers anchored to the back wall. Precariously. As in, 1 thin rail each and 2 screws each drawer. When those screws lost their foothold? Well, you can't fight gravity.

You know, I've had breakdowns in the kitchen - What to fix?, How many people are coming to dinner? Who ate all the ice cream?!!! - but this is the first time  - and, please Lord? Let it be the only time! - I've had a kitchen have a breakdown on me.

After rescuing the canisters and the Keurig, the cookie jar and the candle, we propped the whole contraption back up and called for help. Thankfully, Dan and Lisa were in town. "Hey! How would you like to go to Home Depot with us today?""

"Sure! We'll take the truck!"

Exactly what I had in mind. :)

There was a sale on stock cabinets and I had a gift card that I had received as a Christmas gift (yes, really) so we got out of there without spending too much money out of pocket. Praise the Lord!

We put the existing butcher block laminate counter top back on top of the new cabinets for the time being. Baby steps.


This, and the three drawers that bravely held it all together for the 30+ years of the house's existence was all there was to set out for the garbage:

The facade of our cabinets

Since we were not doing custom cabinets we put individual units side-by-side. Notice the boxes? I love them!  "Security!" they soothe. :)


Later we picked out counter tops from Menards and Pastor Dad installed them. Since this was an emergency project we didn't have the time to save up for granite or composite. Maybe someday. Maybe... For now, we went with a HD (high definition) laminate. (It was on sale, too.)


The next step was the sink, the garbage disposal, and the faucet. Then I began gluing tile to the wall. This time the back splash really is tile and not a painted facsimile. (See my post about the painted apple tile here.)


We added new lights, too. You can see the one over the sink in the picture below. The ceiling fixture is similar.

We kept the apple cookie jar. You probably know why. The apple pattern canisters are staying as well.

Notice in this picture that the sink holds dishes at various stages of washing. These days the sink always holds dishes at various stages. That's because the dishwasher decided to quit in March, about a week after I had braved one of the few cold but sunny, snow-free days to paint the front panel out on the back patio to match the rest of our appliances. If only it had died sooner I would have been spared the effort.

We'll replace the dishwasher soon. It just didn't meet the same urgency as the collapse of the bottom cabinets. ("Oh, it's just the dishwasher that broke. Pshaw!" Words I never thought I'd say after the luxury of having one for 14 years.)

A working view of the kitchen

A close up of the tile with bronze insets

We stained the bottom cabinets just. last. week. They aren't the color I had in mind but I can live with it. (As long as I stay away from Pinterest, that is. The bottom cabinets were supposed to be "light" just like the top ones are "dark" with the idea to continue the theme of the tile. Somewhere there is a salesman laughing at me.)  Someday we'll replace the upper cabinet DOORS ONLY and the facades to match the bottom ones and everything truly will be uniform once more. (Oh, please tell me that the top cabinets can't hear me! I don't want them to unexpectedly have problems, too!)

Cabinets, counter top, sink, faucet, and renegade dishwasher as well as surviving canisters and Keurig, cookie jar and candle

Here's a look at the room in the other direction. I tiled all the way across, from wall to wall. Just don't look too closely. There are places where it might look like I was too lazy to take down the radio and just stuck tiles behind it. Oh, wait! That's exactly what I did do!


To help tie everything together, meaning the old upper cabinets with new lower ones, we added matching knobs that mimic the copper and oil rubbed bronze of the faucet.  Since we haven't had knobs in all these years we joked that we might need to watch an instructional YouTube to learn how to use them. So far, so good. ;)


And that is how our kitchen came to unexpectedly have a whole new look.

* * *

P.S. We're still working on the peninsula cabinet and counter top. Once we get that finished (it hasn't been for a lack of trying) I'll show you what we did and how we did it. So far, it has been the most difficult part of the whole project and that's saying a lot!

Journal Through the Bible: Week 74 Saturday

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Jeremiah chapter 38

Certain men requested that Jeremiah be put to death for the charge of treason. King Zedekiah responded by saying, "He is in your hand: for the king is not he that can do any thing against you." Wow! He could not even defend himself against his own countrymen yet he thought he could rebel against paying tribute to the king of Babylon!

The men didn't kill Jeremiah outright but they lowered him into a pit where he sunk into the mire. They left him there to die. But remember that God had promised Jeremiah that he would survive the siege and God is faithful! One man, Ebedmelech went to the king and begged to have Jeremiah removed. It took 30 men and rope made from rotten rags to get Jeremiah out of the pit.

King Zedekiah inquired once again of the LORD through Jeremiah. Then Jeremiah was kept as a prisoner in the court of the prison but was not returned to the former place where he was left to die. There he stayed until Jerusalem fell.

Does God issue any commands?

  • In his third inquisition by the king Jeremiah told Zedekiah the words that God had told him to say to the king, namely that any who would surrender to Babylon would be kept alive and the city would not be burnt.


Does God make any promises?

  • If the king and princes would surrender their lives would be spared and the city would not be burnt. But if they would not surrender to Babylon the city would be burnt and the wives and children would be abused.
  • God promised that if the king surrendered he would not be turned over to the Jews who had aligned themselves with the Chaldeans.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • It took much effort and disgusting rottenness to remove the result of sinful acts from Jeremiah. It took much effort on Jesus' part and disgusting rottenness to remove the result of sinful acts from each repenting sinner also.


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • God clearly spelled out the events to come and the means of surviving them but they were unpleasant to King Zedekiah. Scripture clearly spells out the events yet to come and the means of surviving them but they are unpleasant to men.

Friday, July 18, 2014

Journal Through the Bible: Week 74 Friday

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Jeremiah chapter 37

This chapter returns to the time of Zedekiah, the last king of Judah. Zedekiah requested that Jeremiah pray for him but he wasn't willing to repent and follow the LORD'S commands.

The army of Pharaoh helped Zedekiah for a time and the Chaldeans withdrew themselves in that period. When it was safe to leave Jerusalem Jeremiah went to Benjamin to take possession of the land he had bought but one of the captains had him arrested on suspicion of treason. He remained there for several days until Zedekiah secretly met with him to find out if there was word from the LORD. Zedekiah then moved Jeremiah to a different part of the prison and commanded that he be fed until the bread ran out.

Does God issue any commands?

  • God told Jeremiah to deliver the message stating that the Egyptians would leave and the Chaldeans would come again.


Does God make any promises?

  • Zedekiah had sent to Egypt for help in fighting the Chaldeans but God said that the Egyptian army would return to their own land. The Chaldeans would come again and wage a successful military campaign against Jerusalem and would burn it with fire.
  • God promised that Zedekiah would be delivered into the hands of the king of Babylon.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • As a falsely accused man, Jeremiah asked the king what treasonous acts he had committed against the government to bring about the punishment he was enduring. Jesus was also falsely accused of trying to overthrow the government of His day. Both were only "guilty" of delivering the message given to them by God.



Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Not that I identified.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Journal Through the Bible: Week 74 Thursday

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Jeremiah chapter 36

(Another flashback to the time of Jehoiakim, the son of Josiah.)

The Word of God was written down by Baruch the scribe and was read in the hearing of the people who came to the Temple. When the king heard it he was furious! He destroyed God's Word and did it without fear. What a shame that the son of Josiah, the king that reverenced the scriptures and brought about revival to the nation during his reign, had such a blatant hatred for God's Word that he burnt it in the presence of the princes and his advisers.

Does God issue any commands?

  • In the fourth year of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, God told Jeremiah to take a scroll and write all the words of judgment on it that God had spoken to him since the reign of good king Josiah. Jeremiah did so. He dictated all of God's words to Baruch, the scribe. Baruch then read them in the Temple to all who came there.
  • After Jehoiakim destroyed the first copy of God's Word, God told Jeremiah to dictate again to Baruch the same words that were on the first scroll.


Does God make any promises?

  • God promised forgiveness to the house of Judah if they would repent.
  • Because of his blasphemous act of destroying scripture, God promised that Jehoiakim would not have a continual line to sit upon the throne of David and he would not die a peaceful death but would have his body cast out. (Jeconiah was his son and heir but no other physical descendant of theirs inherited the throne. Jehoiakim's brother, Zedekiah, followed Jeconiah.) See also Jeremiah 22:18-19 which states that Jehoiakim's body was throne over the gates of Jerusalem in a most ignominious death. 


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • Jesus is the eternal heir to the throne of David, however, Jesus is not descended from the cursed line of Jehoiakim and Jeconiah. His legal guardian, Joseph, was descended from them.


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • Revelation states that the Word of God is eternal. No power on earth can destroy it!

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Journal Through the Bible: Week 74 Wednesday

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Jeremiah chapter 35

As previously noted, the chapters of Jeremiah are not ordered chronologically. This chapter is a flashback to the time of King Jehoiakim, the son of Josiah.

Does God issue any commands?

  • God told Jeremiah to take the Rechabites (the men of the family of Rechab) into the Temple and offer them wine to drink.
  • God told Jeremiah to go and tell the men of Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem the question that God wanted them to answer.


Does God make any promises?

  • God would reward the family of Rechab for their obedience. They would never lack a man to stand before Him forever.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • Like the sons of Jonadab (and grandsons of Rechab), Jesus was the Son who obeyed every command of His Father. Like them, He also was a wanderer in Judah. His permanent home, a House with foundations, was in Heaven.


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • We do not know who the descendants of Rechab were but since they were never to lack a man to stand before God forever we will surely meet them in eternity.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Journal Through the Bible: Week 74 Tuesday

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Jeremiah chapter 34

This message was received during the siege.

Does God issue any commands?

  • God sent Jeremiah to Zedekiah with the message that Nebuchadnezzar was going to burn Jerusalem and that Zedekiah would see Nebuchadnezzar face-to-face. Then Zedekiah would be taken to Babylon where he would spend the rest of his life. He would not die by the sword but would die there in peace.
  • God sent Jeremiah to the people after Zedekiah told the people to give liberty to all of their servants. (The princes and people did so but afterward they forced their former servants back into service again.) God reminded the people that they had not followed the covenant agreement with Him that stated they were to set their servants free every 7 years.


Does God make any promises?

  • God promised that Zedekiah would not die by the sword.
  • God promised that the people who reneged on their promise to set their servants at liberty would die by the sword or pestilence or famine.
  • God promised destruction to the princes that tried to divine the future by cutting a calf in half and walking between the two parts.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • The 7th year of Liberty as stipulated by God's covenant with the Jews was a picture of the liberty provided by the perfect Son of God. He sets the captives free.


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • The king of Judah, Zedekiah, was going to stand before the king of Babylon, Nebuchadnezzar, who would judge him. Zedekiah was warned of this. All the kings of the earth, including those who think they are the rulers of their own selves, will stand before The King, Jesus, who will judge him or her. The Bible warns of this.

Journal Through the Bible: Week 74 Monday

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Jeremiah chapter 33

God's Word came to Jeremiah a second time while in the prison.

Does God issue any commands?

  • God told Jeremiah to call unto Him.
  • God told Jeremiah not to listen when people said that God had broken His covenant to Abraham and to David by sending the people into captivity. God said His covenant with Israel and Judah could only be broken if the appointed orbits of heaven and earth could be broken.


Does God make any promises?

  • God promised that if Jeremiah would call unto Him, He would answer him and show Jeremiah great and mighty things that Jeremiah could not even imagine! (The same is true for all of His people, including us, too.)
  • God promised again that Judah would go into captivity but that their captivity would not be forever. A remnant would return to rebuild because God would cleanse them from their sin and would rebuild the promised land through these redeemed.
  • God promised that Jerusalem would once again be a place of joy. There would be weddings and celebrations there once more!
  • God promised that in His time He would send the Branch of Righteousness of David as promised to Israel and Judah and He will execute judgment and righteousness in the land.
  • God promised that David would never want for a man to sit upon the throne of the house of Israel. He said that this promise can only be broken if a man can stop day and night from happening.
  • The Levites and priests will never lack for men to minister before the LORD. (See also Rev. 1:6)


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • God promised joy, peace, and a name of honor before all nations. All blessings that are received at the hand of God come through His Son, Jesus Christ. He is the One that stood over Jerusalem and wept over her because He loves her. It is this city that He will claim as His capital. He will reign there in the promised joy, peace, and honor before all nations.
  • God promised there would be the voice of the bridegroom and the voice of the bride in Jerusalem once more. Revelation 21 signifies that Jerusalem itself is adorned as a bride as it comes out of Heaven. The Bridegroom, Jesus, will be there and the redeemed will say, "Praise the LORD of hosts: for the LORD is good; for his mercy endureth forever." (As is mentioned here in verse 11)
  • Jesus is the Branch of Righteousness of verse 15.
  • Jesus is the Man who will sit eternally on the throne of David.


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • The promised rebuilding of Judah by the redeemed remnant is a figure of the rebuilding of the earth by the redeemed remnant of mankind.
  • Jesus, the Branch of Righteousness of David will execute judgment and righteousness in the land!
  • Just as a wife might be known by her husband's name, Jerusalem will be called "The LORD our righteousness. (see verse 16)
  • Levites and priests will minister before the LORD forever. (Believers are ministers and priests. See also Rev. 1:6)

Monday, July 14, 2014

Journal Through the Bible: Week 73 Saturday

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Jeremiah chapter 32

God gave a message to Jeremiah in King Zedekiah's 10th year of reign. This was the year that Nebuchadnezzar sent his army to besiege Jerusalem because of Zedekiah's refusal to pay tribute money to Babylon. Jeremiah was shut up in the court of the prison within the palace. Jeremiah was to take part in a real estate transaction even though he had prophesied captivity! It didn't make sense to Jeremiah, but he obeyed!

Behold, I am the LORD, the God of all flesh: is there any thing too hard for me? verse 27

Does God issue any commands?

  • God told Jeremiah that his cousin Hanameel would come to Jeremiah to sell him the family inheritance located in Anathoth. Jeremiah was told to buy it.


Does God make any promises?

  • Jeremiah made sure that the evidence of his land purchase was securely recorded and stored because God promised that houses, fields, and vineyards would be possessed in Judah again.
  • In spite of the command to Jeremiah to buy land, God still promised that the Jews would be taken captive by the Chaldeans.
  • God promised to call His people out of every land and bring them again into the land that He called them to possess.
  • God promised that the Jews would one day own the land once more even though they were shortly going to be removed from it and taken to Babylon.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • Jesus is the Great, the Mighty God, the LORD of hosts.


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • God promised that the people to whom He promised the land would one day inherit it. The earth was also created for and promised to God's people. (This originally meant every person that would ever live, but sin separated people from their Creator so now God's people are those who have experienced the new creation so that they are separated from Him no more). One day the earth itself will be renewed and inhabited once again by God's people, all those redeemed from the captivity of sin. (The meek shall inherit the earth. See Matthew 5:5)

TAKE TIME: Would you believe we're off again?

It's true. We're taking another week off because I did not have time to blog last week.  Busy days, people. Busy summer, too. A lot is going on, some of which I need to blog about even though it is not necessarily Bible Journal related. No time to blog about those things either.

This week will be better, the Lord willing. The goal is to be caught up by this time next week.

Hmm. I don't know! That would be just in time to leave for church camp. I do anticipate posting a reading schedule for next week, though, even if it means I will be behind again within hours of doing so.


Saturday, July 12, 2014

Read Through the Bible in 2014: July 14-19 Schedule


7/14/2014      Hosea 3-5 I John 2
7/15/2014      Hosea 6, 7 I John 3, 4
7/16/2014      Hosea 8-10 I John 5
7/17/2014      Hosea 11, 12 II John
7/18/2014      Hosea 13, 14 III John
7/19/2014      Jonah 1, 2 Revelation 1, 2

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Journal Through the Bible: Week 73 Friday

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Jeremiah chapter 31

This chapter tells of the restoration of Israel.

Does God issue any commands?
  • God told them to weep no more.
  • God told them to note that a woman would compass a man.

Does God make any promises?
  • God promised to restore Israel, the one that He loves with an everlasting love.
  • God promised that tears would be dried because their children would come again into the land that God gave them.

Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?
  • Jesus is the shepherd of the flock.
  • Jesus is the redeemer of Jacob.
  • The prophecy of the weeping Rachel who mourned for her children who were not was fulfilled in the early life of Jesus when Herod had the young children put to death in Bethlehem.
  • A woman would compass a man! Mary, a virgin, would give birth to Jesus. He would have no earthly father.


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?
  • God promised to be the God of all the families of Israel. The Apostle Paul told the Gentiles that all who trusted Christ were spiritual Israel so this passage of restoration has future implications as well.
  • The passage talks of no more sorrow in Israel. This is yet to come!
  • Each person will be judged according to his or her own work. Family relationships will factor into the equation.
  • God promised a new covenant with Israel, an everlasting covenant, when each person will know the LORD! (See 31:31-34.) God swore this oath upon His mighty creation! (This passage is quoted in Hebrews 8:9-12.)
  • God promised that the city of Jerusalem would never be destroyed again. (This would be the New Jerusalem.)

Journal Through the Bible: Week 73 Thursday

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Jeremiah chapter 30

Does God issue any commands?

  • God told Jeremiah to write the things spoken to him by God in a book. 


Does God make any promises?

  • God promised to bring His people back from captivity.
  • God promised that the yoke would be removed from Jacob's neck and all would serve David their King.
  • God promised rest for Israel and destruction for her enemies.
  • God promised that they would be His people and He would be their God.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • At the end of Jacob's trouble Jesus will rule on the throne of David. (30:9)


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • God references the pain of the men of Judah as "the time of Jacob's trouble" and stated that he would be saved out of it. Jacob had trouble various times in his life, including the time when he was on the eve of meeting his brother Esau and then when he feared the inhabitants of Canaan because of the Shechem debacle, or even in the time when his family was on the verge of starvation but they were saved by the grain stored in Egypt at the provision of Joseph. Each time Jacob was saved by God. The Jews were often called "Jacob" or Israelites and they often experienced a time of trouble. This included the time of Babylonian captivity. Daniel's end time vision was given to him while he was studying this passage of Jeremiah concerning the time of Jacob's trouble so this seems to point to dismaying times for God's people at the end of this age as well. The good news is the phrase, "but he shall be saved out of it." Each time there is trouble for Jacob God delivers! 
  • God stated that all these things will be considered in the latter days.

Monday, July 7, 2014

TAKE TIME: July 7-12, 2014 Schedule

Introduction: The rulers did not like Jeremiah's message from God. One king even burnt the scroll that contained God's Word. That didn't stop God! Nor did it stop Jeremiah, the man that God sent to deliver the message to the king.

 Assignment:
  • Monday - Jeremiah chapter 33
  • Tuesday - Jeremiah chapter 34
  • Wednesday - Jeremiah chapter 35
  • Thursday - Jeremiah chapter 36
  • Friday - Jeremiah chapter 37
  • Saturday - Jeremiah chapter 38
Memory Verse

Call unto me and I will answer thee and shew thee great and mighty things which thou knowest not.  Jeremiah 33:3

Prayer Journal (ACTS)
  • Adoration - Praise God that He is the Eternal Author! His words abide forever!
  • Confession - Ask God to reveal hidden sin in your life and then confess it.
  • Thanksgiving - Thank God for any answers to your prayers.
  • Supplication - What are your prayer requests this week? List them for future reference so that you can see how God answers.
Search the Scriptures

Look for references for each of the following:
  • Promises that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?
  • References that either refer to or infer something about future events.
  • What does this passage teach about Jesus?
  • Commandments that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?
Putting the Word into Action

Most people do not destroy scripture. They just don't read the copy of it that they own! And many who read it do not obey it. Pay attention to ACTS of prayer this week. Confess the areas of your life that do not measure up to God's Word. He might show you great and mighty things this week if you call upon Him!