Saturday, August 30, 2014

Journal Through the Bible: Week 78 Thursday

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Daniel 2:46-3:30

Does God issue any commands?
  • God did not speak to Shadrach, Meshach, or Abednego, but they knew that He had commanded that they worship no other gods!

Does God make any promises?

  • God did not speak but He acted on behalf of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego when they were in the furnace. These three had told the king that they did not know if their God would rescue them but He could if it was His will. They would worship only Him whether He saved them from the fire or not. And He did! God promises good to those who love Him. Sometimes that means being delivered on this earth and sometimes that means being delivered from this earth.


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?
  • When Daniel is promoted to the position of ruler over the whole province of Babylon he requests that his Godly friends Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego be placed over the affairs of the province. This must mean that they also ruled the province under Daniel's authority and Daniel was ruling under Nebuchadnezzar's supreme authority. When Jesus is promoted to the position of King over the whole world He will request that His Godly friends be placed over the affairs of the kingdom. Believers will reign under Jesus' authority and Jesus reigns under the Father's supreme authority.
  • Jesus is the 4th person walking around in the fiery furnace with Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. Nebuchadnezzar even remarks that this man looks like the Son of God.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?
  • In the analogy above, Jesus rules now in Heaven but believers must wait until the time that the Kingdom is also on earth before they rule and reign with Him.
  • In the future judgment, the fire will have no power over the servants of the Most High God!

Friday, August 29, 2014

Journal Through the Bible: Week 78 Wednesday

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Daniel 2:1-45

Nebuchadnezzar dreamed a dream that troubled him but he forgot what happened in the dream! He then demanded that his wise men tell him both the dream and the interpretation.  Daniel asked his friends to pray. Then God revealed the dream and the interpretation to Daniel.

There is a God in Heaven that revealeth secrets
 Does God issue any commands?

  • Implied is a command that Daniel tell the king the dream and the meaning of it. It would not make sense for Daniel to have such knowledge and not tell the king! He and all of the other wise men would have perished!


Does God make any promises?

  • God promised nations following nations, each a little weaker than the one before it. (God gives quite the history lesson to Daniel and Nebuchadnezzar! We have the advantage of hindsight.)
  • God promised that an everlasting kingdom would follow the dominion of the nations made of iron and clay. 


Does this passage teach anything about Jesus?

  • Jesus is the stone that was cut without hands in Nebuchadnezzar's dream. It demolished the great image that Nebuchadnezzar saw.


Does this passage teach anything about yet-future events?

  • The nations and the world powers represented by the different materials in the image seen by Nebuchadnezzar in his dream will one day come to an end. This is represented in the dream by the broken parts being blown away like chaff. Then Jesus will rule upon the earth. (Many Bible scholars place our time as that represented by the feet of mingled iron and clay.)

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Journal Through the Bible: Week 78 Tuesday

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Daniel chapter 1

Daniel was taken captive as a young man during the reign of Jehoiakim. He was most likely of noble birth himself. This chapter tells us that he served in Babylon until the first year of Cyrus. That means his ministry in spanned the whole 70 years of captivity!

Does God issue any commands?

  • God did not speak but the commands of God that Daniel purposed to follow in this foreign country were the dietary laws given to Moses.


Does God  make any promises?

  • God did not speak in this chapter, but God gave great knowledge to Daniel and his three friends, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah which showed that God had a plan for them.


Does this chapter teach anything about Jesus?

  • Daniel purposed that he would not be defiled by the things that the worldly king had to offer. Jesus also purposed that He would not be defiled by the things that the king of this world had to offer.
  • Daniel was tested for 10 days with food that the world offered but he refused it. Jesus was also tested by Satan with food after a 40 day fast but He refused it. The law of God and love for it and Him set the standard for each of them.
  • When Daniel stood before the king he was able to answer him wisely. When Jesus stood before the governmental and spiritual leaders of His time He was able to answer them wisely. 


Does this chapter teach anything about yet-future events?

  • One day we will each stand before The King so we should study to show ourselves approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth. (II Timothy 2:15)

Journal Through the Bible: Week 78 Monday

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Psalm 137

This song of mourning and retribution is not attributed to any specific Hebrew captive. It is a psalm that reminds Christians that we must sing the LORD'S song in a strange land no matter how hard it is to do so! How else will they hear of our God or of His city?

Most Christians understand mourning. It is the idea of retribution that gives us problems. It just doesn't fit with what we see as the Christ-like model. However, God  is not a flat character. He is a well-rounded Individual who tells us to love our enemies and pray for them while there is hope for their repentance but He is also the Judge who takes vengeance on anyone who mistreats those whom He loves.

Is the psalmist claiming that he will be ecstatic when the Babylonians are tormented by those who take them into captivity? Or is he declaring that the Babylonians' conquerors will celebrate the victory much like the Babylonians celebrated their victory over Judah? The text seems to state the latter. Babylon would one day be treated by their enemies in the way they treated the people of Judah. It is clear that innocents cruelly died in each conquest.

The psalmist does ask for God to remember Edom who mocked when their distant relatives were in trouble. The Edomites must have encouraged the Babylonians to destroy Jerusalem. They got their wish.

Does God issue any commands?

  • God does not speak.


Does God make any promises?

  • God does not speak, but this author obviously was acquainted with God's promises made to Jeremiah concerning His coming vengeance upon Babylon.


Does this psalm teach anything about Jesus?

  • Jesus wept when He remembered Zion also. He remembered the holy city that it had been and wept because it had become a city that had forgotten her God.


Does this psalm teach anything about yet-future events?

  • The captives would not forget Jerusalem no matter what! Those of us who love God will not forget about the city of our God! That is why we wait for the New Jerusalem.

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Journal Through the Bible: Week 77 Saturday

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Psalm 79

This is a psalm requesting that God avenge Jerusalem. It is attributed to Asaph, a psalmist and musician during the reigns of David and Solomon, in which case it would predate the Babylonian siege by many years. If that be so it would make sense that the people knew this song and sang it to each other during their time of exile. Or perhaps it was written by another Levite named Asaph. There are at least 2 men in the Bible that had that name who are listed in I Chronicles and perhaps there were others, including one at a later date. The psalm seems to accurately describe the total destruction of Jerusalem.

This psalm is written as an anguished prayer.

Does God issue any commands?

  • God does not speak.


Does God make any promises?

  • God does not speak.


Does this psalm teach anything about Jesus?

  • The psalmist requests that God not remember former iniquities. We have the promise of God that when we repent of our sins and trust that they are paid by the shed blood of Jesus Christ God will remember them no longer.

Does this psalm teach anything about yet-future events?

  • The bodies of the Hebrews were scattered everywhere. Their bodies were preyed upon by scavengers. In future times the bodies of the Israeli enemies will be scattered everywhere and they will be preyed upon by the scavengers. In other words, when the psalmist requests that God render unto their neighbors sevenfold we find the answer to this petition in Revelation.