Thursday, January 31, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 4 Thursday

Source

Job chapter 22

For the third time in this book, Eliphaz falsely accuses Job of doing something reprehensible and then hiding it. He even goes so far as to name a few sins in verses 5-11 that he is sure Job must be committing! He then boasts of his own goodness by assuming a "Look at me!" attitude in verses 18-20 which is followed by an invitation to Job to do likewise (verses 21-30). What a preacher Eliphaz is! A false one, to be true, but with himself as a sermon illustration how can he fail?  ;)

Does God make any promises in this passage? If so do they apply to me?
No, really there are not any promises found in this passage even though it might seem as though there are many in verses 21-30. This is an early version of a corrupt "health and wealth" gospel that states that if a person will just trust God he or she will receive good health and riches beyond imagination. That might be true in the New Earth but it certainly doesn't apply on this one! Even Jesus' most faithful followers suffered terribly for their faith!
Are there references to Jesus in this passage?
Verses 12-14 hint of God's omniscience and omnipresence. Jesus, as the eternal Son of God shares these attributes with the Father and the Holy Spirit. Eliphaz obviously believes that God possesses these attributes even if he misuses them here.
Are there references to future events (in the future for us, that is) in this passage?
None that I saw. More likely, verses 15 and 16 reference the Flood, an event that had occurred between 300 and 400 years prior. As Jesus told those listening to Him, when He returns the world will be just like it was in the days of Noah (Matt. 24:37; Luke 17:26)
Does God make any commands in this passage? If so, to whom? And are they commands that I also must obey?
God does not speak in this passage and Eliphaz perverts God's words so once again there are no commands!

Did you find anything else of interest to you? Please share!

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 4 Wednesday

source

Job chapter 21

Job replies to Zophar's accusations that he is a wicked man destined for punishment by pointing out that the wicked are not necessarily punished immediately (see verses 7-15). And besides, he isn't one (see verse 16).   So there!  :)

Does God make any promises in this passage? If so do they apply to me?
Since this is Job speaking we have a better opportunity of finding the promises of God in this passage than when his friends speak. One promise that seems to permeate the last half of the chapter is that God sees everything, including the works of the wicked, and shall reward accordingly (see verses 17-20). This may not sound like much of a promise for the believer, but    it is always good to know that God puts limits on the wicked!
Are there references to Jesus in this passage?
Verses 19 and 20 portray God as the righteous judge and as the conquering warrior. Both of these descriptions fit Jesus in His future roles.
Are there references to future events (in the future for us, that is) in this passage?
Not specifically, but as mentioned above, verses 19 and 20 could be said to foretell future judgment.
Does God make any commands in this passage? If so, to whom? And are they commands that I also must obey?
God does not speak in this passage and there are no commands even though we could definitely heed Job's warning about being wicked!

Did you find anything else of interest to you? Please share!

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 4 Tuesday


Source


Job chapter 20

Zophar speaks for the second time.

Does God make any promises in this passage? If so do they apply to me?
One would think so when one reads verses 23 through 29 and in a sense, there are promises that the wicked will be punished, but Zophar takes liberties with the promises of God by saying that a wicked person will be punished in this life ("When he is about to fill his belly, God shall cast the fury of his wrath upon him, and shall rain it upon him while he is eating.") Uh, not necessarily so! God is very patient and is in no hurry when it comes to punishing evildoers.
Are there references to Jesus in this passage?
None that I saw. Do you think it is a coincidence that Job's friends do not speak of the promised redeemer like Job does?
Are there references to future events (in the future for us, that is) in this passage?
None that I identified.
Does God make any commands in this passage? If so, to whom? And are they commands that I also must obey?
God does not speak in this passage and there are no commands even though Zophar's words make it appear as though God is issuing commands through him.

Did you find anything else of interest to you? Please share!

Monday, January 28, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 4 Monday

source
For I know that my redeemer liveth and that he shall stand at the latter day upon the earth: And though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God: Whom I shall see for myself, and mine eyes shall behold, and not another; though my reins be consumed within me.
Job 19:25-27



Job 18:1-19:29

Chapter 18 contains Bildad's second accusatory speech against Job and chapter 19 contains Job's rebuttal. Chapter 19 also contains some of my favorite passages found in this whole book!

Does God make any promises in this passage? If so do they apply to me?
The promise of the resurrection isn't given by God - because God does not speak - but Job clearly believes in the promise of the resurrection.
Are there references to Jesus in this passage?
Like Saturday's passage, this one contains a set of verses that sound very much like they are speaking of the suffering Messiah and not just Job. These are found in 19:6-14.
Then there are the verses quoted above (19:25-27). Jesus is the redeemer!
Are there references to future events (in the future for us, that is) in this passage?
In the same verses above, Job tells of the future coming of Christ to the earth. He also states that he will see God with his eyes even though death destroys the body. This speaks of bodily resurrection.
Does God make any commands in this passage? If so, to whom? And are they commands that I also must obey?
God does not speak in this passage and there are no commands.

Did you find anything else of interest to you? Please share!

Sunday, January 27, 2013

Sunday Psalm: The Godly and the Ungodly


Psalm 1

1 Blessed is the man that walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful. 2 But his delight is in the law of the LORD; and in his law doth he meditate day and night. 3 And he shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of water, that bringeth forth his fruit in his season; his leaf also shall not wither; and whatsoever he doeth shall prosper.

4 The ungodly are not so: but are like the chaff which the wind driveth away. 5 Therefore the ungodly shall not stand in the judgment,nor sinners in the congregation of the righteous. 6 For the LORD knoweth the way of the righteous: but the way of the ungodly shall perish.


Psalms 1:1-6 (KJV)

Saturday, January 26, 2013

TAKE TIME: Jan. 28 - Feb. 2 Assignment


Introduction:  Job's three friends, Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar continue to preach to Job that God is punishing him for some wickedness that Job will not reveal and Job continues to affirm that he has no hidden sin in his life to cause God to punish him so severely. Although he is suffering terribly, Job announces that he will trust God no matter what trials God allows to be put on him. Remember as you read that the things that his friends say are NOT TRUE! But let the words that Job speaks about God encourage you. His words in chapter 19 about the resurrection and the scriptures are eloquent and his speech in chapter 26 about God's work of creation are poetic.

Reading Assignment:
  • Monday - Job 18:1-19:29
  • Tuesday - Job 20
  • Wednesday - Job 21
  • Thursday - Job 22
  • Friday - Job 23:1-24:25
  • Saturday - Job 25:1-27:23

Memory Verse

But he knoweth the way that I take: when he hath tried me, I shall come forth as gold. Job 23:10

Prayer Journal (ACTS)
  •  Adoration - This week take time to praise God each day that He is omnipresent. You are never really alone!
  • Confession - God already knows about each sin but confess any as they come to your mind and ask Him to help you not sin that way again.
  • Thanksgiving - Thank God that He did write Job's words in a book so that you could read them (Job 19:22-23). Did He answer any of your prayer requests this week? Name them by name. Thanks Him also for any prayers that He has answered even if the answer was no because He knows what is best in each situation.
  • Supplication - What are your prayer requests this week? List them for future reference so that you can see how God answers.

Search the Scriptures

Look for references for each of the following:
  • Promises that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?
  • References that either refer to or infer something about future events.
  • What does this passage teach about Jesus?
  • Commandments that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?

Putting the Word into Action

Sometimes bad things happen even to good people. Do you know someone who loves God but is going through a very difficult time right now? First, add their name to your prayer request list. Then send them a card or a note of encouragement this week to tell them that you love them and are praying for them.

Journal Through the Bible: Week 3, Saturday

source




Job 16:6-17:16

Read the verses in chapter 16 slowly and carefully. Do they remind you of any GREAT event?

Does God make any promises in this passage? If so do they apply to me?
There are no promises of God in today's reading except when compared with other scripture.
Are there references to Jesus in this passage?
If Job's friends are the anti-type of Jesus then Job is a type of Christ. Beginning at chapter 16 verse 6 and reading through chapter 17 verse 12 we can see a beautiful foreshadowing of the crucifixion.
In 17:15 Job questions where is his hope? Several verses in the psalms say that our hope is in the Lord (see Psalm 39:7, 71:5 for example). 
Are there references to future events (in the future for us, that is) in this passage?
None that I could identify.
Does God make any commands in this passage? If so, to whom? And are they commands that I also must obey?
God does not speak in this passage.

Did you find anything else of interest to you? Please share!

Read Through the Bible in 2013: Jan. 28 - Feb. 2

Take Ten


1/28/2013     Genesis 13-15 Matthew 11
1/29/2013     Genesis 16-18 Matthew 12
1/30/2013     Genesis 19, 20 Matthew 13
1/31/2013     Genesis 21-23 Matthew 14
2/1/2013     Genesis 24, 25 Matthew 15, 16
2/2/2013     Genesis 26-28 Matthew 17

Friday, January 25, 2013

Decorating the Kitchen Around a Keepsake

(I'm home-bound and phone-watching today so I decided to deviate from the usual post to tell about one of my past diy projects. I needed something to help pass the time)

When we lived in Tennessee our kitchen colors were blue and white but when we moved to this house in Ohio the kitchen was decorated in green and I had to quickly adapt since we moved when October turns to November and the weather can be a mixed bag around here. Turns out that I adapted so well that I ended up making it my own by adding touches inspired by a certain keepsake.

This cookie jar is now 35 years old

When I was a young bride-to-be my grandma gave me this apple cookie jar as a shower gift. I could never bring myself to part with it if for no other reason than it was given to me by the only grandparent that lived long enough to see me walk down the aisle.

Canisters and place settings were the first items to be added in  the apple theme

The real adaptation was on the wall behind the sink. It lacked a backsplash and was covered with marred and dirty checkered green wallpaper. After looking it over and determining that it would take more time and money to get the paper off than we had to spend on a Kitchen Makeover (which is on our list of home remodeling projects under the heading of Someday When Money Is Not An Object) it was determined that an inexpensive, quick fix was needed. We decided faux tile was the answer. I painted this behind my kitchen sink and under the existing light fixture (which will be changed in that "someday" makeover):


Supplies:

  • Porter Paint in a semi-gloss finish to match the color we painted the rest of the kitchen (which happened to be a tan color)
  • 4 colors of Apple Barrel paint (red, green, white, and a slate color to imitate grout)
  • rags, sponges, and mini paintbrush
  • painter's masking tape
  • a ruler
  • self-adhesive decals
  • Plaid Clear Acrylic Sealer Gloss (aerosol spray)
It took several days to do this project, mainly because tiles next to each other could not be masked at the same time. One tile had to dry thoroughly before it could be masked over to allow its neighbor to be painted.

First we painted the wall with the Porter Paint and let it dry for several days. It looked so much better already! Next I drew the grid lines with a straight-edged ruler remembering to add space for the "grout."

 The "tiles" are standard 4.25 inch squares bordered by standard-sized edge piece "tiles" (not shown). I masked the first tiles I could paint being careful that they were not tiles next to each other. I used rags and sponges to get the effect I wanted. If I made a mistake I painted over it with the Porter Paint and left that tile unmasked until every other tile was painted (I only messed up one tile). This took several days.

When all of the "tiles" were painted and had thoroughly dried I again masked each tile in order to paint the "grout" between them. Once everything, tiles and grout, was dry I sprayed several coats of sealer over them, allowing plenty of time between coats. This took a couple of days.

The faux tile backsplash works as well as a real one. Splashes and drips wipe up quickly and it still looks nice after several years.

SOMEDAY will eventually come and then we can decide on something more permanent to fill the wall behind the sink, but for now the temporary faux tile continues to function as hoped and coordinates well with the keepsake cookie jar, which will never be changed.

Journal Through the Bible: Week 3 Friday

Source

Job 15:1-16:5

Chapter 15 contains the second speech given by Eliphaz and the first few verses of chapter 16 are words of condemnation that Job directed to all three of his friends.

Notice that Eliphaz answers Job's sarcasm with a bit of his own!

Does God make any promises in this passage? If so do they apply to me?
There are no promises of God in today's reading. Remember that Eliphaz was the friend who had frightening night visions which told him half-truths and flat-out lies that contradict God's goodness.
Are there references to Jesus in this passage?
No, as mentioned before, Job's friends are the anti-type of Jesus. For instance, in 16:2 he calls them miserable comforters. Jesus was known for the comfort He gave to anyone who was afflicted and willing to trust Him for healing.
Are there references to future events (in the future for us, that is) in this passage?
None that I could identify.
Does God make any commands in this passage? If so, to whom? And are they commands that I also must obey?
God does not speak in this passage.

Did you find anything else of interest to you? Please share!

Thursday, January 24, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 3 Thursday

Source

Man that is born of a woman is of few days, and full of trouble. He cometh forth like a flower, and is cut down: he fleeth also as a shadow, and continueth not. Job 14:1,2


Job 13:1-14:22
Evidently Job's faith rebounded because chapter 13 contains some of the most beautiful scripture concerning love of God:

Though he slay me, yet will I trust in him: but I will maintain mine own ways before him. He also shall be my salvation: for an hypocrite shall not come before him.  Job 13:15-16
 These verses are found within Job's continued rebuttal to the arguments of Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar. He also gives them a warning of his own in 13:6-11, a warning that those who have read the book know comes to pass at the end. These friends were not seeking Job's welfare, nor were they speaking for God! They were the busybodies of their day who had come for the sole purpose of trying to writhe a juicy confession out of Job.

Does God make any promises in this passage? If so do they apply to me?
Job is the only speaker in today's reading but he does recite promises about the future that the patriarchs clearly understood.
Are there references to Jesus in this passage?
In 13:3 Job states that he would like to reason with God. Jesus makes just such a thing possible! (Isaiah 1:18)
 Jesus is also the only person who could bring a clean thing out of an unclean thing (14:4).
Are there references to future events (in the future for us, that is) in this passage?
Yes, 14:10-14 describe the death, burial (sleep of the body), and the resurrection (described as "my change" in verse 14).
Does God make any commands in this passage? If so, to whom? And are they commands that I also must obey?
God does not speak in this passage.

Did you find anything else of interest to you? Please share!

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 3 Wednesday


Adrift (taken by author)


Job 11:1-12:25

Chapter 11 is the first speech made by Job's friend, Zophar. Chapter 12 is Job's reply.

There is a verse containing a sarcastic quip made by Job that I often quote to myself whenever I am annoyed with those that I think are being "holier than thou." (And I beg your forgiveness if you think that describes me at times.) Anyway, it is 12:2, "No doubt but ye are the people, and wisdom shall die with you.

Who said scripture can't be humorous?  :)

Does God make any promises in this passage? If so do they apply to me?
Although Zophar seems to be reciting the promises of God (see 11:15-19) he really isn't. God never made such promises, at least not for the sojourn through this life!
Are there references to Jesus in this passage?
The description of God's powers in 12:9-25 apply to Jesus. As part of the eternal Godhead Jesus is the "ancient" of verse 12.
Are there references to future events (in the future for us, that is) in this passage?
None that I identified, however, many of the descriptions of destruction that God brings about will also happen in the future.
Does God make any commands in this passage? If so, to whom? And are they commands that I also must obey?
God does not speak in this passage.

Did you find anything else of interest to you? Please share!

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 3 Tuesday

Source


Job 9:1-10:22

I love this passage! In it, Job presents his case as though he was the defendant and God was the plaintiff in a trial. Job wished for the opportunity to declare his innocence and in the process, he take the opportunity to accuse God of certain other unfair actions that include punishing the righteous in the same manner that He punishes the wicked. Although he does not curse God, he certainly does complain about His methods!

Does God make any promises in this passage? If so do they apply to me?
God does not speak in these two chapters, and since Job is trying to build a case against God the words that he speaks do not adequately represent the promises of God either. If anything, at it's very essence Job's complaint is that God does not appear to keep His promises! Job's despair appears so deep that he seems to harbor doubts about the afterlife as well (see 10:21-22). After all, if God does not provide justice for the righteous in this life what can they expect after their deaths?
Are there references to Jesus in this passage?
Yes, in 9:31, 32 Job says, "For he [God] is not a man, as I am, that I should answer him, and we should come together in judgment. Neither is there any daysman betwixt us, that might lay his hand upon us both."
Oh, but he is a man like Job! And he does have a daysman (meaning a mediator or umpire: see link). Once again, Jesus is that daysman. For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus.  I Timothy 2:5

Are there references to future events (in the future for us, that is) in this passage?
Not really. Job's view of eternity is skewed by his anguish.
Does God make any commands in this passage? If so, to whom? And are they commands that I also must obey?
God does not speak in this passage.

Did you find anything else of interest to you? Please share!

Monday, January 21, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 3 Monday

Source

Job 7:1-8:22

Chapter 7 is the list of questions that Job has for God. Chapter 8 is the response of Job's second friend, Bildad.

Does God make any promises in this passage? If so do they apply to me?
God does not speak in these two chapters, and since Job is in a state of confusion he does not speak for God. Since Bildad does not know the real reason behind Job's suffering, although he thinks he does, Bildad does not speak for God either.
Are there references to Jesus in this passage?
In 8:20 Bildad says, "Behold, God will not cast away a perfect man, ..." Actually, it is only because God did cast away the perfect man, Jesus Christ, that we can have a relationship with God. As Ephesians 1:6 says we are "accepted in the beloved." That "beloved" was the one of 2 Corinthians 5:21 "For he [God] hath made him [Jesus] to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him."

Are there references to future events (in the future for us, that is) in this passage?
7:2, 3 - Job is wishing for his life to be at an end so he can receive his reward. We know that Job died many years ago and received some of his reward but even that is but the down-payment for what is yet to come!

Does God make any commands in this passage? If so, to whom? And are they commands that I also must obey?
God does not speak in this passage.

Did you find anything else of interest to you? Please share!

Sunday, January 20, 2013

Sunday Psalm: For Job


Psalm 41

To the chief Musician, A Psalm of David.
1 Blessed is he that considereth the poor: the LORD will deliver him in time of trouble. 2 The LORD will preserve him, and keep him alive; and he shall be blessed upon the earth: and thou wilt not deliver him unto the will of his enemies. 3 The LORD will strengthen him upon the bed of languishing: thou wilt make all his bed in his sickness. 4 I said, LORD, be merciful unto me: heal my soul; for I have sinned against thee.

5 Mine enemies speak evil of me, When shall he die, and his name perish? 6 And if he come to see me, he speaketh vanity: his heart gathereth iniquity to itself; when he goeth abroad, he telleth it7 All that hate me whisper together against me: against me do they devise my hurt. 8 An evil disease, say they, cleaveth fast unto him: and now that he lieth he shall rise up no more. 9 Yea, mine own familiar friend, in whom I trusted, which did eat of my bread, hath lifted up his heel against me. 10 But thou, O LORD, be merciful unto me, and raise me up, that I may requite them. 11 By this I know that thou favourest me, because mine enemy doth not triumph over me. 12 And as for me, thou upholdest me in mine integrity, and settest me before thy face for ever. 13 Blessed be the LORD God of Israel from everlasting, and to everlasting. Amen, and Amen.
Psalms 41:1-13 (KJV)

Saturday, January 19, 2013

TAKE TIME: January 21-26 Assignment



Introduction:  Job's three friends went to visit him after they heard about the troubles he had experienced. First he had lost all of his livestock to roaming bands of thieves, then all of his children were killed in a tornado, and finally Job's own health was destroyed. Although we know that this all happened because God removed some of His protection from Job and allowed Satan to test him (but not kill him), Job and his friends did not know this. Because they believed that Job was being punished by God for some secret sin Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar encouraged Job to reveal his terrible sin and repent of it. Like all men, Job was a sinner, but he had no sins for which he had not repented so God was not punishing him. Job was being tested to show Satan (and us) how someone who loves God should react when troubles come (and they will!). Job maintained his faith and continued to love God in spite of everything bad that happened.

Reading Assignment:
  • Monday - Job 7:1-8:22
  • Tuesday - Job 9:1-10:22
  • Wednesday - Job 11:1-12:25
  • Thursday - Job 13:1-14:22
  • Friday - Job 15:1-16:5
  • Saturday - Job 16:6-17:16

Memory Verse

A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is born for adversity. Proverbs 17:17
Prayer Journal (ACTS)

  •  Adoration - Take time to praise God each day that He is omnipotent. Nothing touches your life without His permission!
  • Confession - God already knows about each sin but confess any as they come to your mind and ask Him to help you not sin that way again.
  • Thanksgiving - Thank God for good friends. Name them by name. Thanks Him also for any prayers that He has answered even if the answer was no.
  • Supplication - What are your prayer requests this week? List them for future reference so that you can see how God answers.

Search the Scriptures

Look for references for each of the following:
  • Promises that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?
  • References that either refer to or infer something about future events.
  • What does this passage teach about Jesus?
  • Commandments that God made and to whom He made them. Do they apply to you?

Putting the Word into Action

Everyone experiences trouble and often we do not understand the reasons why. Like Job, even the righteous suffer. Maybe you know someone who has recently encountered problems. Is there something that you could do to be helpful? Don't be like Job's friends! Be an encouragement! (HINT: babysitting, doing laundry, cleaning their house, cooking them a meal, cutting their grass, washing their car, running errands, taking them to doctor appointments, painting or doing repairs.)

Journal Through the Bible: Week 2 Saturday

source 


Job chapter 6

This chapter records Job's first response to a friend's accusations. Like Eliphaz, he mistakenly believes that God is the source of his torment (v. 4).  Although there is little found in this chapter to answer the four questions, there is much information about Job's belief in the Holy God.

Does God make any promises in this passage? If so do they apply to me?
Job is the speaker and there are no promises given.
Are there references to Jesus in this passage?
Jesus, as the second person of the Trinity, is the Holy One mentioned in verse 10. He is also part of the Almighty mentioned in verses 4 and 14.

Are there references to future events (in the future for us, that is) in this passage?
None that I identified.

Does God make any commands in this passage? If so, to whom? And are they commands that I also must obey?
God does not speak in this passage.

Did you find anything else of interest to you? Please share!

Read Through the Bible in 2013: January 21-26

Take Ten


1/21/2013      Job 32, 33 Matthew 2, 3
1/22/2013      Job 34-36 Matthew 4
1/23/2013      Job 37, 38 Matthew 5
1/24/2013      Job 39, 40 Matthew 6
1/25/2013      Job 41, 42 Matthew 7, 8
1/26/2013      Genesis 11:10-12:20 Matthew 9, 10

Friday, January 18, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 2 Friday

Source
(Sorry, but I couldn't resist a bit of sarcasm)

Job 4:1-5:27

Does God make any promises in this passage? If so do they apply to me?
At first glance there appear to be many promises of God in chapter 5, however since this is NOT God speaking, there are none! Even when the first of Job's three friends, Eliphaz, speaks he is not necessarily delivering a message from God!
For instance, in this speech Eliphaz states his belief that bad things do not happen to good people. We, on the other hand, know this is not true because bad things are happening to the good and honorable Job.
More importantly, Eliphaz tells of the vision he had of a supernatural being that spoke quietly with him in the night (4:12-21). Notice that the being whispers words that seem to be a mockery against both God and men (vv.18,19 "Behold, he [God] put no trust in his servants; and his angels he charged with folly [the fallen angels that rebelled against Him]: How much less in them that dwell in houses of clay, whose foundation is in the dust, which are crushed before the moth? [obviously speaking of people here])
Since Eliphaz seems to have received his message directly from Satan there is nothing that can be taken as a promise in this passage! The words Eliphaz received from the evil spirit were half-truths at best, much like the words the serpent told Eve.
Are there references to Jesus in this passage?
No, but when Eliphaz tells Job to "Call now, if there be any that will answer thee: and to which of the saints [the redeemed of God] will thou turn?" (5:1) we know that the promise of God is quoted in Hebrews 13:5 "I will never leave thee nor forsake thee..." so even when people (those earthly saints) turn their backs on Job the God of the Universe (as the complete Trinity) was there with Job even though he could not see Him or feel His presence.

Are there references to future events (in the future for us, that is) in this passage?
None that I identified.

Does God make any commands in this passage? If so, to whom? And are they commands that I also must obey?
God does not speak in this passage.

Did you find anything else of interest to you? Please share!

Thursday, January 17, 2013

Journal Through the Bible: Week 2, Thursday

Summer in the meadow (taken by author)

Job 2:11-3:26

I did not find much to answer the questions I am searching for in this passage, but I did notice something else that I have never noticed before. I will share that thought at the end.

Does God make any promises in this passage? If so do they apply to me?
I did not see any direct promises in this passage because God does not speak, but perhaps what I noticed today might be thought of as a "promise."
Are there references to Jesus in this passage?
No, but Job's friends are definitely the "anti-type" of Jesus who is "a friend that sticks closer than a brother." (Proverbs 18:24)

Are there references to future events (in the future for us, that is) in this passage?
Not exactly, except that there is reference to a person who dies being at rest, which would take  for granted a time when that body would awaken again, hence a future resurrection.

Does God make any commands in this passage? If so, to whom? And are they commands that I also must obey?
God does not speak in this passage.

Here is what I noticed in Job 3:11-17. In the verses before these Job mourns that he was ever born and wishes that no one would regard the day of his birth. In these verses he says that if he had died in the womb or had been stillborn his body would have been at rest. It might seem like a small thing to some, but in the debate about the eternal state of infants, born or unborn, it seems to me to be a BIG deal and a comfort.

Did you find anything else of interest to you? Please share!

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Journal Through The Bible: Week 2, Wednesday

Source

Job 1:1-2:10

Job is thought to be the contemporary of Abraham. He is also thought to be descended from the great-grandson of Noah, Uz, through Noah's son, Shem (see Genesis 10:21-23).

Does God make any promises in this passage? If so do they apply to me?
There are no direct promises in this passage but Satan complains about the hedge of safety that God has put around Job to protect him. It is probably safe to presume that God provides such protection for all of His righteous servants. Nothing touches our lives that God does not allow!
Are there references to Jesus in this passage?
He isn't mentioned directly but this passage clearly calls Satan the accuser and we are told in I John 2:1 that Jesus is our Advocate! When Satan argues the unworthiness of the righteous Jesus argues that His blood is the propitiation* that makes that individual righteous! (I John 2:2)
*Propitiation is an offering or sacrifice that appeases wrath. It is a noun, not a verb.

Are there references to future events (in the future for us, that is) in this passage?
None that I identified.

Does God make any commands in this passage? If so, to whom? And are they commands that I also must obey?
There are several commands given to Satan specifying how far Satan could go in afflicting and tempting Job. First he was able to destroy all of Job's wealth and property. He was also able to kill several of Job's servants and all of his children. Then he was given permission to harm Job personally but not take his life.

Did you find anything else of interest to you? Please share!

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Journal Through The Bible: Week 2 Tuesday

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Genesis 10:1-11:9

Chapter 10 is the table of nations through whom we all descend. The first part of chapter 11 tells why there are different language families throughout the world.

Does God make any promises in this passage? If so do they apply to me?
There are no direct promises in this passage, however, in 11:6-7, God states that confusing the languages places certain limits upon sinfulness. This affects each of us since the lack of a universal language prohibits each of us from directly encouraging everyone else in evil.
The obverse is also true. Due to the language barrier it is harder to take the gospel to other cultures.

Are there references to Jesus in this passage?
Aside from the fact that there are more references to the world's genealogy generally and Jesus' genealogy specifically we are told that God said, "let 'us' go down" in 11:7. This would be a reference to the trinity: Father, Son (Jesus), and the Holy Spirit.

Are there references to future events (in the future for us, that is) in this passage?
Not specifically, but in his book Heaven Randy Alcorn points out that in Revelation 22:2 John says that the leaves of the Tree of Life are for the "healing of the nations" and that this is the third time in two chapters (Revelation chapters 21 and 22) that the inhabitants of the New Earth are called nations. (The others are Rev. 21:24 and 26.)
I, personally, have no problem with this. We are are all of one race (the descendants of Adam and Eve), which makes us all related by blood in one degree or another (speaking genealogically) but we are currently divided into tribes and cultures (or nations). It is not hard to imagine that we could reside accordingly upon the New Earth, too. The difference being that without the sin nature that caused the language barriers there will be no wars or fighting like we see on this earth. 

Does God make any commands in this passage? If so, to whom? And are they commands that I also must obey?
There are no new commands but by dividing the languages God forced His command given in chapter 9 to replenish the earth to be carried out.

Did you find anything else of interest to you? Please share!

Monday, January 14, 2013

Futility and Grief: A Study Taken from the Life of Noah

source
(This is an edited and rewritten version of an article that previously appeared on this blog.)

FUTILITY AND GRIEF
Have you ever been required to do something that you knew was doomed before you even began? Or something seemed like a good idea at the time but later it became obvious that it was going to fail? Or perhaps through circumstances beyond your control you had to sit on the sidelines watching the game of life instead of participating in it?

This feeling of futility can result in grief which can then lead to depression. It can often be identified when someone throws up his hands in exasperation and says, “What’s the use?” This question signals that the person concludes that further effort is a complete waste of time.

Futility can strike anyone. Some examples are people having a hard time recovering from illness, the elderly who have been confined to hospitals and nursing homes, or preachers who pour their hearts into their ministries but see no evidence of lives being changed. There are many other circumstances that cause it as well.

It is not uncommon for those whose health was once vigorous to reach the point of depression when they become so ill that their recovery, if it comes at all, takes longer than anticipated. Perhaps the rapid advances in the field of medicine have tempted us to believe that almost anything can be cured instantaneously.

A frequent visitor to nursing homes will often hear the complaint, “Why has God left me here? He should take me home because I cannot do anything anymore.” Evidently a person in this predicament can still minister in some way even if it is only to teach the more vigorous people the lessons of patience and grace necessary for completing life's race. This is particularly true of those suffering from dementia.

Other suffering Christians that have their wits can still have a vibrant ministry even though their bodies are failing. They can be the retired soldiers constantly petitioning the Commander-in-Chief on behalf of those on the front lines. Everyone has an assignment from God even when they think they serve no useful purpose.

As a pastor’s wife I have met many families going to and returning from the mission fields. Those going are excited and challenged by their future. Those returning often show signs of depression caused by futility. Can you imagine learning a foreign language as an adult, uprooting your family to an area where the customs and culture are totally unfamiliar and then reaping a spiritual harvest of . . . no one. Not a single convert! This sometimes happens. These feelings are not reserved for those who minister in foreign countries. Many pastors in so-called "Christian" nations reach the same level of frustration when they prepare nourishing spiritual food each week only to see it rejected for worldly junk food.

Noah was just such a preacher. Like the Christians of today, he was only a sinner saved by grace. He believed God and obeyed Him by building the ark to save mankind and the animal kingdom from extinction. According to II Peter 2:5, Noah was preaching as he was building. It is evident that none heeded his message as the only ones who entered the ark were Noah and his immediate family. Preaching to the masses seemed futile, but obeying God is never futile. As a result Noah and his family did not suffer the same fate as the rest of mankind.

We rejoice in the story of Noah’s triumphant salvation from the flood but do we consider what his life was like after it? Noah became a vineyard keeper. Perhaps all those years of preaching without having even one convert tore at this heart and resulted in his drunkenness. Not only did all of his neighbors die a physical death but they died a spiritual one as well! That thought could cause one horrendous case of grief!

Only God and Noah know what went on in Noah’s heart during those years when the earth’s population was sparse and the memory of its former population lived only in his mind. Unlike Adam and Eve who lived alone with just their own family and knew no one else because there was no one else, Noah and his family had encountered many people.

Not only did all of Noah's acquaintances die in the flood as a consequence of rejecting his message, but his own descendants did not take seriously the consequences of disobeying God! The seeds of wickedness found fertile soil almost immediately. About 100 years after the flood Noah's extended family built the Tower of Babel upon the Mesopotamian plains, that monument to man's depravity that necessitated a restraining act of grace by God. This was an event Noah lived long enough to see. In comparison, it took Noah and his immediate family 120 years to build the Ark, that former monument to man's depravity and God's grace.

We preach the same message that Noah preached and work for the same God that he did. The Bible says that we live in a wicked world similar to the days of Noah, and like Noah, those who believe God find grace. There is destruction coming, but God has provided an Ark of safety. It was God’s message in Noah’s day and it is still God’s message today.


7 Be not deceived; God is not mocked: for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap. 8 For he that soweth to his flesh shall of the flesh reap corruption; but he that soweth to the Spirit shall of the Spirit reap life everlasting. 9 And let us not be weary in well doing: for in due season we shall reap, if we faint not. 10 As we have therefore opportunity, let us do good unto all men, especially unto them who are of the household of faith.
Gal 6:7-10 (KJV)


Journal Through the Bible: Week 2, Monday

A rainbow from a recent storm 


Genesis 8:20-9:29

Does God make any promises in this passage? If so do they apply to me?
God promised in 8:22 that as long as the earth is in existence there will always be days and seasons with their heat and cold. This does apply to me (and everyone else). We either believe in the annihilation theories of Global Warming or we believe God. 
God made a covenant with Noah, his descendants, and every living creature in 9:9-17 that He would never destroy the world by water again. He gave the rainbow in the clouds as the token of His promise. This promise applies to me and everyone else, including any animals. This also tends to make me believe in the theory of a canopy above the earth prior to Noah's flood. If there was rain prior to this time, wouldn't there have been a rainbow in the sky since all the necessary elements - water and light - were present? See here for recent article at Answers in Genesis concerning this debate among creationists.

Are there references to Jesus in this passage?
As part of the triune God, Jesus is one who make the covenant with Noah. He also is still keeping this covenant today.

Are there references to future events (in the future for us, that is) in this passage?
Yes, God promised that the world would never again be destroyed by water but He did not promise that the world would never be destroyed at all! He tells us in Revelation 21:1 that this earth will pass away. We see in II Peter 3:7-12 that this earth will be destroyed by fire. Isaiah 65:17 states that there will be a New Earth and this is restated in Revelation 21:1.

Does God make any commands in this passage? If so, to whom? And are they commands that I also must obey?
God repeated the command to replenish the earth. People and animals are still reproducing today. (9:1, 7)
God allowed men to eat meat from the point of the flood onward but He commands that the blood of animals not be eaten. (9:3-5) 
God instituted capital punishment in 9:6 by commanding that anyone who kills another person be put to death by other men.

Did you find anything else of interest to you? Please share!

Sunday, January 13, 2013

Sunday Psalm: In Honor of Noah

Psalm 46

To the chief Musician for the sons of Korah, A Song upon Alamoth.
1 God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble. 2 Therefore will not we fear, though the earth be removed, and though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea; 3 Though the waters thereof roar and be troubled, though the mountains shake with the swelling thereof. Selah. 4 There is a river, the streams whereof shall make glad the city of God, the holy place of the tabernacles of the most High. 5 God is in the midst of her; she shall not be moved: God shall help her, and that right early.

6 The heathen raged, the kingdoms were moved: he uttered his voice, the earth melted. 7 The LORD of hosts is with us;the God of Jacob is our refuge. Selah. 8 Come, behold the works of the LORD, what desolations he hath made in the earth. 9 He maketh wars to cease unto the end of the earth; he breaketh the bow, and cutteth the spear in sunder; he burneth the chariot in the fire. 10 Be still, and know that I am God: I will be exalted among the heathen, I will be exalted in the earth. 11 The LORD of hosts is with us; the God of Jacob is our refuge. Selah.
Psalms 46:1-11 (KJV)